Boris Johnson clearly forgot to switch on the oven containing his Brexit deal

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Monday 07 December 2020 16:00
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Brexit briefing: How long until the end of the transition period?

As the UK and EU struggle on to try and achieve a deal, one should remember that it was not long ago that Boris Johnson told us: "That oven-ready deal I talked about so much during the election campaign has already had its plastic covering pierced and been placed in the microwave."

Despite these assurances, this has proven yet again to be another apparent untruth in Mr Johnson’s ever-growing back catalogue.  A no deal, which remains a strong option, will mean deeper economic pain and disruption, and will, at least according to the EU's calculation, simply put off a scenario where he will have to sign up to an even worse deal.

Mr Johnson may have claimed to have an oven-ready deal, but he clearly forgot to switch the oven on.

Alex Orr

Edinburgh

At a renowned restaurant there were 28 tables, and all were full and the atmosphere was that of jovial party spirit.

The diners at table 28 behaved slightly differently and objected to the behavior of the others.

Eventually those at that table demanded their table be taken out into the street and for them to be served there. The restaurant refused to comply, so the diners picked up their table and moved outside.  As they were denied food by the restaurant they decided to order a fast food delivery.  

This took time as none of the diners could agree, some wishing for fried chicken, others preferring kebabs, while others desired more exotic foods from further afield.  As the food slowly arrived, cold and unappetising it began to rain, but when the diners demanded umbrellas from the restaurant it was refused; so they went across the street and bought a marquee which they placed over their table.  Then the police arrived as their table was blocking the street...

If this sounds like an unlikely, selfish, destructive and costly act, then why is Brexit such a good idea?

Matt Minshall

Brittany, France

Government ministers are at pains to point out that the EU could be damaging itself if it tries to make a Brexit deal too stringent.

I am reminded of the weather report many years ago which said “Fog over channel, continent cut off”.

Attitudes, in some quarters at least, have clearly not changed.

Susan Alexander

South Gloucestershire

Right from the start of the referendum campaign we have been told that when it comes to Brexit “no deal is better than a bad deal” and that we will flourish trading with the EU under the same terms as Australia.

So if we do leave without a deal there’s no need for Johnson and other Brexiteers to waste time floundering around looking for scapegoats to point fingers at.  Instead all they need to do is strike out for those sunlit uplands they spoke so lovingly of and deliver on all those promises.

John Simpson

Ross-on-Wye

Needing vaccination

With the imminent release of the first vaccine against Covid-19 in the UK, I have decided that the idea of being anti-vaxx has gone beyond a joke and is now a dangerous risk to public health.  

I am nearly 70 and will avoid all social interaction until I have been vaccinated, and then I will only socialise with people who have been vaccinated, or who can explain a valid medical reason not to be.  

I’m hoping more people will take a similar stance, even though I’m not on social media to promote it.  

Richard Le Corney

Nottingham

Importance of healthcare

Whatever else comes of the 2020 election and the idiotically-politicised Covid-19 pandemic, one lesson should be clear.  

Whether healthcare was intended by our founding fathers as an inalienable right, good quality basic healthcare for all citizens and for all resident human beings is a matter of national security.

Scott Hartley

Fairfield, Iowa

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