Letters: An encouraging message sent by London to the rest of the world

Send your letters to letters@independent.co.uk

Sunday 08 May 2016 15:49
Comments
The new London mayor greets well-wishers outside Southwark Cathedral after attending his swearing-in ceremony
The new London mayor greets well-wishers outside Southwark Cathedral after attending his swearing-in ceremony

The people of London must be commended for acting with maturity and with a sense of rationality in their decision to trust a Muslim politician as the new Mayor of their vibrant city.

They have not allowed anti-Muslim sentiment and media's sensationalism to sway them from electing Sadiq Khan as a Mayor of one of the most civilised cities in the world.

They deserve salutation and recognition especially at a time when Donald Trump is trying to close the doors on Muslims and portray them as an elusive enemy everyone should guard against.

Londoners have made history in overcoming the hyper-sensationalised fear of “the other.”

They have shown that we ought to overcome this baseless fear and enmity of our neighbours.

I wish Mr Khan great success in his new job.

Abubakar Kasim

Ontario, Canada

Zac Goldsmith ran a disgusting racist campaign in his bid to be the Mayor of London.

In a desperate bid for office, Goldsmith's campaign linked his main rival Sadiq Khan - and by implication all Muslims - with terrorism. This tactic was last employed in election material circulated by the BNP.

And it didn't work. Glorious multicultural London with its 7 million people, 14 major faiths, and where you can hear over 300 languages spoken, rejected Goldsmith's racist poison.

Nevertheless the Tories are not apologising for their tactics.

Tory MP Michael Fallon dismissed their use of dog whistle racism as “just part of the rough and tumble of politics”.

Tory Chancellor George Osborne has rejected criticism of Goldsmith's campaign.

Fallon's comments show where the Tories really stand on racism. They see it as as a political tool to gain opportunistic advantage over their rivals.

The use of racism is never “just part of the rough and tumble of politics”.

Racism is a social poison and is never acceptable - especially when it is used by those who seek to run society.

I'm delighted Londoners rejected Goldsmith's racist tactics.

Congratulations to Sadiq Khan - Mayor of London.

Zac Goldsmith can go rot on the compost heap of history.

Sasha Simic

Stamford Hill, London

How many members of the Conservative party will be suspended for their racist attacks on Sadiq Khan?

Anthony Phillips

Oxford

Rest of England deserves the same as London

Your analysis of Thursday's elections ('Sadiq Khan and Ruth Davidson were yesterday’s big winners', Sat 7th May) doesn't mention the real losers. Those of us in England, who live outside Greater London, were obliged to use the archaic first past the post system to elect our councillors.

Everyone in the rest of the UK uses systems more suited to the multi-party environment that has been the reality of British politics for more than half a century; are we non-metropolitan English perhaps considered too dim to cope with such modernity?

In Cheltenham, for example, the Labour and Green Parties each got around 7% of the vote and could thus reasonably expect to have 6 councillors between them in our 40 seat town. But neither has any. A similar story was repeated all over England.

Our rotten, unfit-for-purpose electoral system hands power to people who represent only a minority of their electorate. No wonder so few people bother to vote.

Brian Hughes

Cheltenham, Glos.

SNP only stands for one thing

One might have thought that, after a referendum campaign in 2012-14 and two major election campaigns in 2015 and 2016, Nicola Sturgeon would at last settle down to governing, using the powers she has and making badly needed improvements in the areas of devolved responsibility, especially education. If one had thought that, one would have been naïve.

Ms Sturgeon has made it clear that, after being returned at the head of a minority government, her top priority is a ‘summer campaign’ to persuade those who voted No in 2014 that separating from the UK is a great idea.

This will no doubt please those who joined the SNP after the referendum whose dearest wish is a second referendum. But, for the rest of us, it merely confirms that the SNP is not a governing party at all. Its skimpy outline of a programme for government is a mere fig leaf. The SNP is nothing more than an agit prop campaigning party.

Jill Stephenson

Edinburgh

Junior doctor talks demand maturity from both sides

It’s good that talks are being resumed over the Government’s dispute with the junior doctors. As a start, it might be helpful if Jeremy Hunt would drop that persistent but unconvincing mantra ‘We are determined to carry out our manifesto commitment’. There are glaring flaws in that claim.

Firstly, what if that manifesto commitment is shown to be manifestly unjust?

Secondly, the claim would be justified if at the last election the Conservative party achieved a healthy majority and an even healthier share of the votes. It achieved neither, and therefore to claim it has a mandate for its increasingly obdurate approach is disingenuous.

But it reflects the way in which a PR- driven administration is fixated on image and political point- scoring which spreads to both sides of the divide. Thus a sensible concession - achieved by persuasion or painful extraction - is instantly seized upon as a ‘climb down’ or U-turn by one side, and ‘a listening Government’ by the other.

This is a sterile way of negotiating. Moreover, it appears to overlook those anxiously awaiting operations or the equally worried patients in the over-crowded A and E departments. If the junior doctors are finally driven to make some uncomfortable concessions they could at least see this as an admirable affirmation of their sacred oath: ‘First do no harm.’

Donald Zec

London

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in