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Sweet and low: Adrian Lyne

The director of 'Unfaithful' (on release now), chooses his best and worst scenes of all time

Leading article: Brief encounters

WHAT ARE we to make of a country from its choice of favourite films? The British have voted for their top 10 British movies. And it transpires that most of what they like is black-and-white, and made in the immediate post-war period - the top one (The Third Man) has two Americans as its stars, and the second (Brief Encounter) has a married woman doing the decent thing by her spouse.

`Psycho' given a curtain call as best Hitchcock movie

PSYCHO, THE terrifying tale of Norman Bates and his mother, has been voted the best film Alfred Hitchcock ever made by a distinguished panel of directors.

Hitchcock Centenary: `You want her to be murdered'

From showers and crop-sprayers to handcuffs and windscreen wipers: we ask, what's your favourite Hitchcock moment?

Film: A short history of the cinema redhead

Witty, wilful, wild... Next to the screen's scarlet women, blondes are merely bland. By Nina Caplan

Film Studies: The mood of desire in movies was often palpable. I miss it

I'd guess from her obituary that it was in 1951 I cut the picture of Lili St Cyr out of - well, probably the News of the World. That was the year of her breakthrough. She got small movie spots after she had had the wit to be charged with indecent exposure during her bubble-bath act at Ciro's, a nightclub on Sunset Boulevard. She was artfully defended in court by Jerry Giesler, who asked Miss St Cyr (I read the name as "Miss Sincere") to repeat portions of her act. He then turned to the jury and enquired whether they had been emotionally ravished or indecently interfered with - or whether they hadn't had a swell time.

People and Business: Star & stripes

AN AMERICAN law firm which specialises in IT, Shaw Pittman Potts & Trowbridge, has just opened an office in London. But its links with the UK go back rather longer. Ramsay Potts, the firm's founder, was a bomber pilot during the Second World War and flew his missions out of England. He was also the commanding officer of one James Stewart, matinee idol.

Of all the lousy sequels in all the world...

YOU MUST remember this ... Rick Blaine, the Humphrey Bogart character from Casablanca, was once a small-time Jewish gangster in East Harlem, who had an affair with a senator's wife and ran off with his boss's fortune. As for his lost love, Ilse Lund, she went to Prague with her husband, Viktor Laszlo, to plot the assassination of the Nazi Reinhard Heydrich.

Letter: Mismatch

BY NOW, I am sure that you have been told that in the feature on drunken journalists ("No more sleaze on the street", Real Life, 27 September), the photograph and the legend did not match up.

Preview: Eye lights

One does not readily associate Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers and Rita Hayworth with 19th-century tribal dance, but photographs of both will be on display in Gotta Dance. Classic dance photographs from the Twenties, Thirties and Forties and works by well known masters of the 20th century are featured in this romp through dance and photography. Everything is for sale; prices start at pounds 250. Michael Hoppen Photography, 3 Jubilee Place. Information: 0171-352 3649. Tue-Sat, 12-6pm. Ends 31 January.

look gotta dance!

The John Kobal Foundation has dipped into its founder's private collection to produce "Gotta Dance!", a new exhibition of dance photographs from the Twenties, Thirties and Forties. Kobal was an avid collector of film photography, as the images of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers (right), Rita Hayworth, Eleanor Powell and Louis Armstrong on show demonstrate. A heady and eclectic mix of other pictures - from 19th-century tribal dance to works by modern masters such as Lois Greenfield and Alfred Eisenstadt - will complete this display, an adventure in motion pictures.

pounds 48,000 for `Casablanca' poster

A promotional poster for the film Casablanca was sold for pounds 48,800 at Sotheby's yesterday - a record for a film poster.

Maybe he was even cleverer than he was sweet

Everyone has his or her favourite Jimmy Stewart picture - but we all shared in everyone else's too. He had been to Princeton, but he smacked of small towns on the prairies. There was so much of him to go around, and such a collective affection for the tall, wide-eyed, hesitant, idealistic and innately lovable young man, with that drawling, let's-work- it-out-as-we-go-along voice, the aching flex of romantic and liberal indecision - it was a voice Stewart was doing long before all the impersonators in the business found him as their fail-safe act. Later in life, in relaxed talk shows, when he could put words and thoughts together as well as or better than most people, Stewart was capable of "doing" himself, of going tongue-tied and well, golly, now - as if a rabbit in his mind kept interrupting him. In other words, "Jimmy" Stewart was a sweet guy and a very clever actor. And don't be taken aback if, one day, some book comes out to tell us he might even have been cleverer than he was sweet.

Hollywood's last great gentleman bows out

The actor James Stewart, star of more than 75 films, has died at his home in Beverley Hills, California. Stewart, who won an Oscar for his role in The Philadelphia Story opposite Katherine Hepburn, suffered a cardiac arrest yesterday morning. He was aged 89.
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Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 30 January 2015
As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

Mussolini tried to warn his ally of the danger of bringing the country to its knees. So should we, says Patrick Cockburn
Britain's widening poverty gap should be causing outrage at the start of the election campaign

The short stroll that should be our walk of shame

Courting the global elite has failed to benefit Britain, as the vast disparity in wealth on display in the capital shows
Homeless Veterans appeal: The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty

Homeless Veterans appeal

The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty
Prince Charles the saviour of the nation? A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king

Prince Charles the saviour of the nation?

A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king
How books can defeat Isis: Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad

How books can defeat Isis

Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad
Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

She may be in charge of minimising our risks of injury, but the chair of the Health and Safety Executive still wants children to be able to hurt themselves
The open loathing between Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu just got worse

The open loathing between Obama and Netanyahu just got worse

The Israeli PM's relationship with the Obama has always been chilly, but going over the President's head on Iran will do him no favours, says Rupert Cornwell
French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

Fury at British best restaurants survey sees French magazine produce a rival list
Star choreographer Matthew Bourne gives young carers a chance to perform at Sadler's Wells

Young carers to make dance debut

What happened when superstar choreographer Matthew Bourne encouraged 27 teenage carers to think about themselves for once?
Design Council's 70th anniversary: Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch

Design Council's 70th anniversary

Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch
Dame Harriet Walter: The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment

Dame Harriet Walter interview

The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment
Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Critics of Tom Stoppard's new play seem to agree that cerebral can never trump character, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's winter salads will make you feel energised through February

Bill Granger's winter salads

Salads aren't just a bit on the side, says our chef - their crunch, colour and natural goodness are perfect for a midwinter pick-me-up
England vs Wales: Cool head George Ford ready to put out dragon fire

George Ford: Cool head ready to put out dragon fire

No 10’s calmness under pressure will be key for England in Cardiff
Michael Calvin: Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links