Jonathon Fletcher: How the forgotten father of the search engine was trumped by Google

The Yorkshireman is being hailed as the father of the search engine for his innovative webcrawler

Will Adamsdale and Fraser Ayers in Stuart - A Life Backwards

Edinburgh 2013: Stuart: A Life Backwards - Fraser Ayres gives an electrifying central performance

There is a stunning performance at the heart of this theatrical adaptation of Alexander Masters' award-winning biography. Fraser Ayres plays Stuart Shorter, a chaotic, garrulous homeless man who has spent his life fighting - abuse, muscular dystrophy, drug addiction, poverty.

The Mona Lisa is arguably the most recognisable painting in the world

Small is beautiful: The molecular art that’s made a mini-masterpiece of the Mona Lisa

The Mona Lisa is one of the most reproduced images of all time, but art fans may struggle to make out that enigmatic smile on one unusual replica.

'Most embarrassing Fox News interview ever' sends Reza Aslan's biography of Jesus to number 1 in the Amazon book charts

A respected academic, who just happens to be Muslim, was challenged by a Fox News anchor as to why he was qualified to write about Christ

Google Doodle celebrates 93rd birthday of DNA pioneer Rosalind Franklin

Biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer made breakthroughs in the field of DNA structure

Mighty mouse: Engelbart with the first prototype of his invention

Doug Engelbart: Inventor of the computer mouse

Douglas Engelbart was the inventor of the mouse, the simple tool that dramatically changed the way in which humans interact with their computers. Since the first public demonstration of the mouse in 1968 over a billion have been sold worldwide. Although now slowly being overtaken by touchpads and touch-sensitive screens, the mouse and the concepts behind it, remain an important feature of all modern computers.

New hope for spinal injuries: scientists have 're-grown' cells in paralysed rats

US scientists have reported a major breakthrough on the road to treating spinal injuries that result in paralysis.

Wot I learned at university

Graduation is a time for introspective leavers to take stock of all they've learned from their time at university. For James Ashford, it didn't take all that long

Research matters: 'How can we help young talents develop?'

RCUK wants to know how you've used your PhD, says Rick Rylance

Studying great works with a gothic flavour

Stephen Hoare investigates Manchester Metropolitan University's new centre tackling the dark side of the arts

Edward Snowden, NSA whistleblower, studied for a Masters degree in Computer Security at the University of Liverpool

It is believed that the former CIA technical assistant learned many skills here which informed his work for the US government

Is a Masters an isolating experience?

You've got more work and less structure, and most of your uni friends have moved on and away into the world of work. Is a Masters isolating, asks Harriet Williamson

Thousands of protesters gathered in Istanbul

'Just a few looters’: Turkish PM Erdogan dismisses protests as thousands occupy Istanbul's Taksim Square

Turkey’s Prime Minister has rejected claims from protesters, who have taken to the streets across the country over the past two days, that he is an authoritarian leader, as thousands of people marched and reoccupied the centre of Istanbul.

Andrew Dickson White, first president of Cornell University

The insider’s guide to a humanities MA

Days of wild clubbing abandon and blagging your way through reading are no more when it comes to a Masters degree, but that doesn't mean your old life is gone for good. There's a lot to look out for, so here is my insider’s guide to an MA in the humanities.

Clever Girl, By Tessa Hadley

High culture and low life embrace in a novel of youthful promise foiled by maternal bonds

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

Solved after 200 years

The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

Sunken sub

Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

Age of the selfie

Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

Not so square

How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

Latest on the Labour leadership contest
Froome seals second Tour de France victory

Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

The uses of sarcasm

'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

No vanity, but lots of flair

A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

In praise of foraging

How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food