Scientists found evidence that human ancestors used stone-tipped weapons 200,000 years earlier than once thought

Prehistoric arms race started earlier than previously thought

Scientists have found evidence that human ancestors used stone-tipped weapons 200,000 years earlier than once thought, findings that may change notions about the capabilities of prehistoric people.

Postgraduate Diary

Hannah Larsen is bringing a taste of CSI to the south coast of England

Postgraduate queries

'It's all about being mindful and culturally sensitive'

MBA Student of the Year highlights role of soft skills, says Russ Thorne

Researchers moving into a different field can bring experience along with a fresh perspective

Why do a Masters in your 30s?

Tito Akindele is highly qualified. So why has he come back for more?

Editorial: A scientific genius – and generous to boot

Sir John Gurdon is a remarkable man. Not only has he won this year's Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology, but he intends to spend his half-share of the estimated £750,000 prize on funding PhD students in their fourth year, when normal funding usually dries up. This extraordinary act of generosity is typical of the 79-year-old, who still works full time in his Cambridge laboratory.

'Expenses saint' who backed Cameron is star in the making

When Grant Shapps rises from his platform seat at Birmingham's conference centre on Sunday to open the Conservative Party festivities, it will be the latest highlight on a remarkable CV.

Colin Firth condemns 'cruelty' of Home Office decision to deport seriously ill woman to Nigeria

Actor Colin Firth has condemned “the cruelty” of a Home Office decision to deport a seriously ill woman to Nigeria, where doctors say she may die because of the limited availability of affordable healthcare.

Get ahead with a postgraduate course

Graduates can benefit from staying in higher education, says Paul Dinsdale

Politics is the study of power and how power works

What's it like to study... Politics

Tim Oliver studied BA Politics and International Relations at the University of Hull, and is now studying a PhD there

Egyptology takes you back thousands of years to explore an ancient civilisation - their texts, temples, and monuments. This is the Great Sphinx of Tanis, at the Louvre Museum in Paris

What's it like to study... Egyptology

Just over a decade ago, Gemma Smith decided she was going to be "the next Evelyn O’Connell". She has since graduated from Swansea University with a first class honours degree in Egyptology, and is about to start her MA in Ancient Egyptian Culture.

Paulos in 2007

Abune Paulos: Religious leader and peace activist

Abune Paulos led the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church, which has more than 40 million members, as well as serving on the Central Committee of the World Council of Churches and its Commission on Faith and Order. He was one of seven serving presidents of the WCC. While he was instrumental in interfaith dialogue initiatives, Abune Paulos was vocal in several international platforms, including the World Economic Forum and the World Summit of Religious and Spiritual Leaders at the United Nations.

Eunice Benedicto hopes her MBA will equip her for humanitarian missions

This year’s most promising future business leaders

Our joint scholarships are lowering financial barriers, says Russ Thorne

Soldier shot in Afghanistan 'was a fine young man'

The father of Lieutenant Andrew Robert Chesterman of the 3rd Battalion The Rifles, who died as a result of wounds sustained in enemy action while on patrol in Afghanistan, said today that his family had lost “a fine young man”.

August 3, 2012: Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins of Great Britain celebrate with their gold medals draped in a Union Jack during the medal ceremony for the women's double sculls

Alchemist Anna Watkins helps turn Katherine Grainger's silver into gold in double sculls

ABSOLUTELY the first imperative is that everyone remembers to look upon this beaming, beatific champion and say: “Jolly well done, Anna Watkins!” It is her alchemy, after all, that has finally turned silver into gold. And it was instructive of the charm that has compounded Katherine Grainger’s status, as darling of this regatta, that the glory they shared here yesterday was as much a matter of parity as synchronicity. Reciprocally, however, Watkins will understand if Grainger, having at last requited a 12-year craving, is widely saluted as first among equals.

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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

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60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
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Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

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Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent