Arts and Entertainment

I hadn't realised – until I read this book – how much work Henry VIII's marital problems caused the stonemasons of Hampton Court. After years of carving the letters H&C all over the place, Henry got rid of Catherine of Aragon, so the Cs had to be reworked as As. But, no sooner was the last A in place than Anne Boleyn was executed on Tower Hill and the As had to become Js to suit Jane Seymour, who promptly died in childbirth. And there were still three more queens to go, so, lots more chiseling, presumably.

Travel: Are we nearly there? Losing battles for kids - a round- up of mazes

Kent's Hever Castle, near Edenbridge, Kent TN8 7NG (01732 865224) Don't start with the maze, or you may miss the Italian garden, sculpture, cascades and fountains that decorate the childhood home of Anne Boleyn. Open daily, 11am-6pm. Admission pounds 4.90/pounds 3.90.

I wrote a letter to my love

Don't used lined paper and don't be pornographic ... Suzi Feay on the art of putting passion on paper

The capital game tax

It would be reasonable to expect Newcastle United to go to The Valley with their collective chin up today in the wake of their post-Christmas Premiership revival at the expense of the tottering Tottenham and the numbingly negative Leeds. The record books suggest otherwise, however. The last time Newcastle won an FA Cup tie in London the man with football's most-famed jutting jaw was on the score-sheet.

Elizabeth, Edward and the Protection racket

Sexual, verbal and mental abuse, poisoning, beatings, jealousy and paranoia. It was no fun being Henry VIII's children. By Amanda Foreman; Children of England: The Heirs of King Henry VIII 1547-1558 by Alison Weir, Cape pounds 18.99

Arts: Diggers probe for treasures of Tower moat

For the first time in 700 years, the Tower of London's moat is being excavated to determine what treasures lie buried beneath its grassy surface.

The ties that bind

SANDPIPER by Ahdaf Soueif, Bloomsbury pounds 14.99

Princesses and pigeons, birds of a feather

THE CRITICS

fey by name feay by nature

THE suzi feay COLUMN

Beefeaters mourn fading tradition

The guardians of the Tower fear early retirement is the beginning of the end. Steve Boggan reports

Music: CARRERAS

Hampton Court Palace

London: the step-by-step guide Michael Leapman relishes rhododendrons in royal Richmond Park

Richmond Park has London's finest show of azaleas and rhododendrons and this is a pivotal weekend to relish them: many of the rhododendrons are coming into bloom and the azaleas are not yet finished. They form a spectacular climax to this walk around the wildest of London's royal parks, with its magnificent trees and roaming deer.

`One-eyed Luke' keeps the West alive with poetry TOMBSTONE NIGHTS

I watched the movie, I read the books, I steeped myself in the legends of Tombstone and fell in love with John Henry Holliday. Dentist turned gambler, ``Doc'' - as we aficionados call him - was a fetchingly world-weary consumptive who knew Latin and drew a gun faster than any man in the West. Pale, gaunt, hard-drinking, he scorned fools and valued loyalty above all other qualities. To no man was he more loyal than Wyatt Earp, alongside whom he fought for no cause other than friendship in the shoot-out at the OK Corral.

Letter: Just whose faith is he defending anyway?

Sir: With regard to the letter from the Rev Michael Morton (30 June), the title Defender of the Faith was conferred on Henry VIII in 1521 by Pope Leo X in recognition of the king's treatise attacking the Protestant Luther. It was certainly not intended to affirm the Crown in its symbolic task of upholding Christian values, but rather to shore up the Roman Catholic Church in its struggle against a form of the Christian faith that was trying to make a real difference in society.

Future for Thames lies in past: Helen Nowicka looks at a conservation strategy with a vision to protect the river's character

A strategy to preserve the character of an 11-mile stretch of the Thames fringed by listed buildings, parkland and historic villages has been drawn up.

Captain Moonlight: The matter of Greene's breast taken to heart

LET ME come to the point. How many nipples do you have? The Captain has the regulation two. But Graham Greene? Four, it would seem. A letter, part of a forthcoming sale by his family of Greene papers, written by him to Auberon Waugh, and published in the current London Review of Books, reads: 'Dear Bron, I was painfully reminded by your Diary in the 500th issue of Private Eye of the fact that I have four nipples.' Waugh had claimed that a leading lady of broadcasting had a multiplicity of nipples; he wrote back to Greene promising that his secret would be safe. A joke? Waugh now doesn't seem disposed to think so. Greene's nephew, Graham Carleton Greene, remembers hearing about it, but isn't sure. Norman Sherry, the Greene biographer, would not deign to share his thoughts with the Captain. Extra nipples are said to be commonplace; but they have also long been considered a mark of the devil (cf Anne Boleyn, three nipples, six fingers). Could be a chunky thesis in this.
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Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
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The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine