News Boris Johnson is seen as a possible challenger to David Cameron's leadership of the Conservative Party

The Prime Minister has asserted that the London mayor was speaking for himself when he commented that some people are not clever enough to be a success

Eating fibre `may not stop cancer'

ANOTHER SHIBBOLETH of healthy living fell yesterday as US scientists reported that dietary fibre, the raison d'etre of most breakfast cereals, may offer no protection against bowel cancer.

Sports letter: Rich and tired - what a strain

Sir: What is the world coming to? A fortnight ago the Leicester City manager, Martin O'Neill, was complaining that his (presumably well paid) players are "tired", having played two games over three days during the Christmas holiday.

Bryson's America: My last junk food binge drove me to crispbread

I DECIDED to clean out the fridge the other day. We don't usually clean out our fridge. We just box it up every four or five years and send it off to the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta with a note to help themselves to anything that looks scientifically promising. But we hadn't seen one of the cats for a few days and I had a vague recollection of having glimpsed something furry on the bottom shelf towards the back - turned out to be a large piece of Gorgonzola.

Food & Drink: Food for thought-Do we taste with our noses?

IT IS SAID that we feast with our eyes, so it follows that we taste with our noses. All our senses work together to provide the mind with an accurate description of the food we eat: vision (appearance), odour (smell), taste (flavour), physical properties (texture of food in the mouth) and sound (the crackle of breakfast cereals). First, the nose detects the volatile aromas released from foods; then, as food is placed on the tongue, combinations of the four basic tastes (sweet, sour, salty and bitter) are perceived. The two senses, odour and taste, collaborate to produce the sensation of flavour. If you have a bad cold, or you hold the end of your nose, your detection of different tastes is diminished.

The loneliness of the last-minute card sender

This Monday will be the Post Office's busiest day of the year with over 140 million deliveries. And Anne Treneman will have sent none of them

Parliament & Politics: Tories name donors giving over pounds 5,000

WEETABIX, THE makers of Ian Botham's favourite breakfast cereal, emerged yesterday as one of the main corporate backers of the Conservative Party.

Leading Artcle: Who's the real bully over the cornflakes?

KELLOGG'S, THE breakfast cereal company, may be feeling hard done by. It has been told off by the Advertising Standards Authority and the children's charity, Kidscape, for an advertisement it ran earlier this year which featured the issue of bullying. The Kellogg's ad used a plump schoolboy and a quote: "Sticks and stones may break my bones but names could really hurt me". Beneath was the claim that "One of the most common causes of bullying in school is being fat... Of course, a cereal breakfast like Kellogg's can't solve complex weight problems but in its own small way it can really help."

Outcry at Kellogg's bullying advert

A CHILDREN'S charity and an advertising watchdog yesterday criticised Kellogg's for suggesting in an advert that eating its cereals can help prevent the bullying of youngsters at school for "being fat".

Kellogg's cut down to size by shoppers

KELLOGG'S HAS been forced to back down over a change in its breakfast cereal box sizes after customers protested that new bigger Rice Krispies and Corn Flakes packs would not fit into kitchen cupboards.

Health: Corn Flakes could save your life

Pregnant or not, we may all benefit by taking this B vitamin.

By gum, this is rum

No 229: WRIGLEY'S

ARTS: Daring to be boring

PETER YORK ON ADS: No 225: AXA

Health: Good things can be bad

You might think that more bran and vitamins would keep you healthy. Not necessarily, writes Roger Dobson

Letter: Tests for modified food

YOUR article "Test to spot modified foods" was incorrect in saying that Nuclyx and Leatherhead Food Research Association are the first to offer a DNA test for detecting genetically modified food.

Letter: A large gene pool ensures life

THE article by Wayne Brittenden, "'Terminator' seeds threaten a barren future for farmers" (22 March), was extremely worrying. The method of disabling re-germination by interpolating a new gene function could be dangerous. First, if only such plants are available, what could be done if a natural mutation were to arise affecting, say, the yield of such plants, or made them more susceptible to insect-borne viruses? If climate change required breeding of types with new adaptations, how could this be done at speed from a limited gene pool? Who will maintain sufficient varieties for future research, and how is this to be recorded?
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The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss