Sport Louis Smith shows off his Olympic silver medal

British gymnast Louis Smith has put his retirement plans on hold and declared he wants to represent England at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow later this year.

He's the nation's favourite jester. But, will Michael Barrymore's public still love him tomorrow?

On Monday, 24 hours after the People newspaper claimed that Michael Barrymore, "the nation's favourite funnyman", had been spotted in a gay club, groping a young man, and the Sunday Mirror stated he once made a pass at heterosexual impressionist Bobby Davro and the News of the World asserted that he had had sex with ex-aide John Davis (twice - Mr Davis counted), the 43-year-old, six foot three inch comic took to a stage in a shopping mall in Croydon, south London and entertained his still adoring public.

How to lose at the fame game

Imagine being Dale Winton's careers officer. "Well, Winton, what do you want to be when you grow up?" "I want to be a celebrity, sir." "A celebrity? That's not a career. Celebrity's the product of a career. You can't make a living from being a celebrity on its own."

Shutting the door for the last time

To a generation of thirtysomethings, the words "Larry" and "Grayson" signify little more than a limp-wristed flouncer whose incomprehensibly unfunny catchphrase, "Shut that Door", helped earn him celebrity status as the new Bruce Forsyth on The Generation Game in the late Seventies.

The trial run that spells tribulation RADIO

Talk Radio Importance of Being Earnest / R4 Mouth of a Demagogue / R3

Comparisons in the generation game

If there is one area where competition seems to be really effective in the electricity industry, it is the setting of dividends. Investors were treated yesterday to the sight of PowerGen and National Power vying for the largest increase, with NP winning hands down with a promise of 24 per cent. There was much speculation about their motives, and even a suggestion that the discrepancy in the payout was part of an uninentional muddle. Both companies are planning share buybacks on a similar scale, so that does not explain the difference. It is also hard to justify on performance grounds alone.

Obituary: Larry Grayson

William Sully White (Larry Grayson), entertainer: born Banbury, Oxfordshire 31 August 1923; died Nuneaton, Warwickshire 7 January 1995.

The twirl is their oyster: Anthea's spirit lives on. Owen Slot on the pointless but enduring charm of the gameshow girls

'HERE, looking wonderful tonight, is the beautiful Rachel.' The introduction is from Chris Evans, the host of the trendy TV gameshow Don't Forget Your Toothbrush. A drum-roll and applause follow. Camera switch, and there she is. Rachel Tatton-Brown, smiling, waving enthusiastically in her air-hostess outfit.

BEST-SELLERS / Top 10 comedian golfers

----------------------------------------------------------------- TOP 10 COMEDIAN GOLFERS ----------------------------------------------------------------- 1 Jimmy Tarbuck 2 Bruce Forsyth 3 Peter Cook 4 Mike Reid 5 Bobby Davro 6 Roger de Courcey 7 Stan Boardman 8 Tom O'Connor 9 Jim Davidson 10 Paul Shane ----------------------------------------------------------------- Information from the Comedians Golfing Society, London -----------------------------------------------------------------

Right of Reply: Seamus Cassidy defends Chris Evans and his Toothbrush

Derivative', ''Blind Date revisited'. Such were the criticisms levelled at Don't Forget Your Toothbrush (Sat 10pm), Channel 4's new game show hosted by Chris Evans. Seamus Cassidy, Channel 4's commissioning editor of light entertainment, thinks otherwise.

Long Runners: No 9: The Generation Game

Age: 22. Bruce Forsyth first struck the 'Thinker' pose at the top of the stairs on Saturday 18 December 1971 in an adapted version of a Dutch show, Ein van de Acht ('One Out of Eight'), which had been spotted by Bill Cotton, then head of BBC light entertainment. Larry Grayson took over the series in 1978 (when it, perhaps unsurprisingly, became known as Larry Grayson's Generation Game). It was during this period that the show gained its highest ever audience - a monstrous 23.9 million (Saturday 20 October 1979). Grayson continued saying 'Shut that door' until 1981, when the show took a nine-year sabbatical. At the instigation of Jim Moir, then head of light entertainment but also a former Generation Game producer (1971-75), Brucie bounced back in 1990.

Coales' Notes: Going round in dress circles

MONDAY: This morning the Pipeline Radio people were pressing me to accept a ticket to the Sunset Boulevard premiere. They saw 'Andrew Lloyd Webber: has he pulled it off again?' as the number one issue for Thursday's phone-in.

TELEVISION BRIEFING / Laughter in the dark

The bizarre NIGHTINGALES (10.30pm C4) flutter back onto our screens for a second series. The talented trio of Robert Lindsay (last seen on C4 as the paranoid politician Michael Murray in GBH), David Threlfall (in a Michael Bolton-style hairdo) and James Ellis (Z Cars) play three nightwatchmen from hell who while away the hours talking about Harold Pinter and smoking a lot. In tonight's episode, 'Silent Night', directed by Only Fools and Horses veteran Tony Dow, they are visited on Christmas Eve by a pregnant woman called Mary, who proceeds to give birth to several goldfish and enough cuddly toys to keep The Generation Game's conveyor belt stocked for months. Much discussion about allegories and parables ensues. Paul Makin's sitcom is certainly surreal; but is it funny?

MUSIC / The generation game: Robert Maycock on the London Sinfonietta and Capricorn playing old new music and new new music

The trouble with 25th anniversaries is that the next generation has usually taken over. For the London Sinfonietta there's an unfortunate extra twist: it reaches its quarter-century just when, in the eyes of the world, the music it grew up with - never widely appreciated at the best of times - is passing into the realm of the deeply unloved. Can we still believe that in another few decades, listeners will 'catch up'? Hardly: the world of steady progress and advance that this assumes has been gone for years.

BBC chief stands by troubled 'Eldorado'

SIR MICHAEL Checkland, the Director-General of the BBC, said yesterday that the troubled soap Eldorado, would not be scrapped, contradicting reports in Sunday newspapers.
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