Arts and Entertainment

Wigmore Hall, London

Album: Morton Feldman, Trio (Mode)

Written in the early Eighties, Trio was one of Feldman's first long-form pieces employing a conventional chamber palette of violin, cello and piano. It involves neither epic musical narrative nor the tedium of process music, its 105 minutes instead built from his usual small-scale blocks of sound.

Car Choice: Safe, sturdy, and room for growing kids...plus a cello

Christine Farris has written her Vauxhall Agila off in the recent cold snap. Not her fault – she hit some black ice and could not stop, until she made contact with some dustbins and then a gate. Safety is now a priority, as is more room, because she needs space for two growing daughters and a cello. Her budget is £4,000 to £5,000, and Car Choice has agreed to be on call for 24 hours to help get Christine sorted out.

The Cello Suites, By Eric Siblin

Eric Siblin is in many ways just the kind of listener whom musicians love to find in their audiences: an open-minded voyager who's trying something new. JS Bach's cello music entered his life "by chance" shortly after he had ended a stint as pop music critic for the Montreal Gazette, "a job that had filled my head with vast amounts of music, much of which I didn't want to be there".

Knives in Hens, Arcola Theatre, London

An early battle of the sexes

Album: Prokofiev, String Quartets 1&2/ Pavel Haas Quartet (Supraphon)

A slight astringency of tone is all that keeps the Pavel Haas Quartet a notch below the Jerusalem and Belcea Quartets.

Album: Eels, End Times Vagrant

Pity poor Mark "E" Everett: beleaguered by a family background pock-marked with mad genius, suicide and cancer, he's no sooner finally come to terms with turbulent desire in last year's Hombre Loco than he's left shattered by break-up, contemplating End Times.

Borodin Quartet, Wigmore Hall

The Borodin Quartet brings a lot of history to the table – 60 years, to be precise. Personnel may come and go, the balance of personalities may shift, but the identity remains resolutely intact.

Album: Chopin, Cello Music/ Andreas Brantelid (EMI)

Chopin's anniversary avalanche is already in full swing, with this disc by Sweden's highest-flying young cellist leading the field in that instrument.

Departures (12A)

Yojiro Takita's gentle comic drama centres upon a cellist (Masahiro Motoki) who, after his orchestra disbands, returns to his hometown.

London Sinfonietta, Kings Place / Division Lobby, South Bank Centre

The Kings Place electro-acoustic weekend opened with a potential killer-question from its presenter Robert Worby: was it not high time we stopped talking about ‘electro-acoustic’ music altogether?

Album: David Gray, Draw the Line (Polydor)

It's taken David Gray four years to follow up Life in Slow Motion, and frankly, you have to wonder what's been holding him up, as these 11 pleasant, predictable songs represent no great development or deviation from the course of his previous work.

The Cellist of Sarajevo, By Steven Galloway

Canadian Steven Galloway's measured, sombre novel is based on a real incident during the siege of Sarajevo. On 27 May 1992, several mortar shells struck a group of people waiting to buy bread. Twenty-two were killed and over 70 injured. For the next 22 days, a local cellist played Albinoni's Adagio in G Minor at the site in honour of the dead.

Album: Dan Black, 'Un' (A&M)

Widely hailed as one of pop's brighter young things, Dan Black is best known so far for the single "Symphonies", which brings to mind the young Beck.

Album: Boëly, Musique de Chambre – Quatuor Mosaïques, (Laborie)

Half-fossil, half-innovator, organist and composer Alexandre Pierre François Boëly (1785-1858) was the self-appointed guardian of the classical style.

Album: Heinz Holliger, Romancendres (ECM New Series)

Romancendres – a conflation of the French terms for romance and ashes – reflects Heinz Holliger's obsession with Robert Schumann's Romances, burnt by his wife Clara when the composer lapsed into mental illness.

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