Robert Fisk: Violence shows uneasy place of minorities after Arab Spring

Egypt is no stranger to religious tensions – but where do Christians fit into its revolution?

Police seek Amish gang for 'hair-cutting' assaults

Gang warfare doesn't always involve drugs, tattoos and disagreements over rap lyrics. Police in Ohio are investigating an outbreak of violence between rival factions of the Amish community suspected of breaking into homes and cutting off each other's hair.

Why Catholics could learn a lot from Islam

Vincent Nichols, the Archbishop of Westminster, sings the praises of Ramadan – and reflection – to Jerome Taylor

Letter from the i editor: I’ll just say "sorry"

An article in another newspaper (which you won’t have read of course, because you are loyal i readers) made a passing reference to my possibly being more on the defensive in this spot than my illustrious predecessor Mr Kelner.

Prophecy, By SJ Parris

Zounds! An Elizabethan feast – with a surfeit of ham

Feels like teen spirit: Thousands of young people flock annually to a Christian camp in rural France

What is drawing them there? Holly Williams joins the teenaged pilgrims

Robert Fisk: The immortality of a great, if flawed, historian

How many of the Nato admirals fighting the beast of Tripoli realise the origin of their title?

48 Hours In: Dubrovnik

The spirit of this enticing Croatian city is captured in high summer, with an arts festival, al fresco dining and drinking, and plenty of waterside diversions.

Peat bogs, bears and dense forest – it's Europe, but not as we know it

Sankha Guha explores Finland's wild and watery frontier with Russia

Heavenly treasures: Divine altarpieces

The National Gallery's exhibition of medieval and early Renaissance altarpieces is a divine alternative to the summer blockbuster, says Adrian Hamilton

Serbia arrests last war crimes fugitive

Serbia arrested the last major war crimes suspect from the 1990s conflicts in former Yugoslavia today, closing what its president said was a "burdensome" page in the country's history.

The girl in the painting

The legal furore surrounding this watercolour has fascinated BBC viewers, but the story of the family it portrays is even more gripping, says Patrick Cockburn, grandson of the sitter

Ancient articles of faith: Catholic antiquities

Whether you believe in the spiritual power of religious relics or not, the British Museum's exhibition of Catholic antiquities contains some wonderful art, says Adrian Hamilton

Brian Haw

I was privileged to be one of Brian Haw's many friends, writes Nicholas Wood (obituary, 20 June). The judiciary, the police and MPs judged him as mad; it is my belief that one day he will be regarded as the only sane person in this country. He saw before anyone else, in 2001, what was being done in our name to children and mothers and to the human genome. He saw the blind ignorance and greed of politicians like Hoon and Blair using depleted uranium weapons to impose so-called western values on people who did not want their front doors kicked in to the sound of barking dogs. He had pictures of the disastrous effects of depleted uranium weapons on human DNA, and how irreversible that gene damage was.

Emperor and Galilean, National Theatre: London

Admirers of the excellent Andrew Scott (the campily baleful Moriarty in Sherlock) have the chance to feast on his talents in Emperor and Galilean, Ibsen's vast 1873 two-part drama. It here receives its much belated English premiere in a condensed and vigorous adaptation by Ben Power that reduces what would take eight hours to perform uncut to a more manageable three-and-a-half-hour marathon. Traversing Europe and the Middle East and spanning the years 351 and 363 AD, the piece is unveiled in a production by Jonathan Kent that encompasses its epic sweep and philosophical agitation with enormous technical flair and dialectical dynamism.

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