Travel An Edwardian gazebo in Kingston, passed as you meander along the river Thames

The Thames Path combines history with nature as it forges towards the capital from Hampton Court Palace

Obituary: Admiral Sir Anthony Griffin

Admiral Sir Anthony Griffin was the epitome of the versatile and talented naval officer whose life's work fell into two parts. There was his service in the Royal Navy and, following his retirement, his long effort to make the country aware of the importance of the sea at a time when it had become fashionable to dismiss ships and their associated industries and professions as tired and spent forces.

Wren the architect for Kent

Kent 316 and 17-0 Northants 133 and 196 Kent won by 10 wickets

Letter:Design for Wales

Sir: It is well known that the Zaha Hadid design for the much needed Cardiff Bay Opera House did not find favour amongst local people, in much the same way as Sir Christopher Wren's design for St Paul's Cathedral was received in its day. The design was not, however, rejected because, as Jonathan Glancey suggests (article, 6 August), the Welsh were too backward to appreciate it.

Masterpieces in the mind's eye

We asked readers to let their imaginations run free and submit proposals for buildings they would like to see erected with Millennium money - unfulfilled designs, great structures of the past, or even the frankly fantastical. Jonathan Glancey applauds the ideas on show

Castles in the sky

What would Jonathan Glancey do with piles of Millennium money? He'd fulfil the visions of three great British architects and put up the sublime buildings they designed but never saw

City Diary : City big-wigs gather as Dickie flies the coop

The immortal Dickie Bird was given a rousing send-off by the great and the good of the cricketing world at a special Lord's Taverners dinner. At the top table a striking trio found itself thrown together - Ian Botham flanked by Ken Clarke, the Chancellor, on one side, and Howard Davies, deputy governor of the Bank of England on the other. Presumably "Beefy" was put in there to stop the other two droning on about interest rate policy.

Classical: St Matthew Passion; Barbican Centre, London

Two translations enabled 19th-century British choirs to adopt Bach's St Matthew Passion as a pillar of their repertory. Both are already over a hundred years old, yet they have remained the basis for all subsequent singing translations, and what with the advance in knowledge of the performing practices of Bach's time, there has clearly been a need in recent years to review the situation. That is, if, like tenor and noted Evangelist Neil Jenkins, you feel strongly that the search for authenticity need not bind performers to using the original German text.

site unseen: Barnes Railway Station, London SW13

Architecture is the one art which affects us all, whether we like it or not. People can choose not to visit museums, theatres, cinemas or art galleries, but everyone's world is shaped by the buildings around us.

site unseen The RIBA Building, London

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has been much in the news recently. Firstly due to a contentious dismissal, and secondly, much more happily, because of the Institute's plan to move its incomparable Drawings Collection into the Roundhouse at Camden.

Letter: Let the Wren soar above a piazza in Paternoster Square

From Mr Robin Butterell

Time to call off this camp pantomime

Paternoster Square, at the north side of St Paul's, is under threat of being smothered in the vulgar fancy dress of Post-Modern Classicism. Jonathan Glancey calls for an open competition to decide the site's future

ANOTHER VIEW; Grand designs for Greenwich

The old order changes and buildings cannot remain immune, however hallowed they may be. All over the country there are churches that have been declared redundant and converted into concert halls and libraries and even homes. But when a public building of national importance can no longer be used for its intended purpose there is a national responsibility, vested in the Government, to ensure that any new use is entirely seemly.

Tory plea for Naval College

A senior Tory yesterday urged the Government not to allow the historic Royal Naval College at Greenwich to "suffer a similar fate" as the axed Greater London Council's County Hall.

Deadline day for Wren's baroque masterpiece

IAN MacKINNON

Deadline nears for Naval College bids

IAN MacKINNON
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

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Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

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How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

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...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
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Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

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Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

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Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
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Join the tequila gold rush

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Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?