Extras
 

Make getting out of the wrong side of bed on cold winter mornings a thing of the past with our selection of night-time covers

Woollies for plants

Horticultural fleece has the appearance and texture of tissue paper, but being made from polypropylene it lasts outside rather better. I have been experimenting with ways of using it in the garden. It is certainly good for protecting tender plants. My agaves have come through several winters swathed in fleece blankets, like old men fearful of a chill.

Fashion: Dark nights in satin

As the nights draw in, now is the time to think about evening wear. There are lots of slender satin slip-dresses around this autum, made for languishing in darkly-lit, smoke-filled rooms; a hint of Thirties Paris in their self-indulgent decadence. This is the other side of evening wear - glitz, gloss and sparkle replaced by rust and pewter satin, chinese embroidery, garnets and black lace. Dark-rimmed smoky eyes are back; if you don't have dark rings around your eyes already (easily acquired by several fashionably debauched nights), fake it with layers of dark-grey eye shadow against a chalky-white complexion. Very pale and very interesting. One more Gauloise and your voice will break into a low, hoarse whisper. The secret is a little mystery - clothes that look as though they are from another time, another place.

In thing: Georgina von Etzdorf scarves

For vampires and neck fetishists a Georgina von Etzdorf scarf is the ultimate in luxury neck wear. Her fine crepe Volare tulip print scarf has been much sought after by the likes of David Bowie, Mick Jagger, Isabella Rossellini and Miranda Richardson. Other creations include yards of brilliant fuchsia silk, dreamy silver and aquamarine devore velvets and classic silk squares. A new shop brimming with goodies has just opened on three floors in the Burlington Arcade. On the first, her magnificent scarves lie neatly and invitingly in small shallow drawers - waiting to be rumpled, wrapped and taken away.

Vita buys Jackdaw

British Vita is buying Jackdaw Polymers, a nylon and granulated plastic maker, for pounds 9.4m.

Letter: Dyed-in-the-wool fan of Burton's

Sir: I, like Roy Hattersley, remember my first (and only) Burton's suit ('Gone for a Burton', 8 April). Having saved clothing-ration coupons for my 1946 wedding, I acquired a fine, lightweight woollen blanket, which I had dyed and then made into a smart 'going- away' costume at Burton's Palmers Green branch.

Fashion: Pure fabrication

STRANGE though it may seem, nylon is no longer simply used to make clammy men's shirts, slimy sheets, and costumes for bad science-fiction series. At Helmut Lang's spring-summer collections, clothes made out of what looked like bin-bag liners were mixed with sheer pink nylon tops and shifts. At Corinne Cobson, the dayglo colours made the clothes look one hundred per cent synthetic, even if they weren't.

Fashion: No sweater is an island: The traditional aran fisherman's jumper has been trawled for haute couture. Tamsin Blanchard investigates

Aran wool is not a fabric one would normally associate with ballgowns. It is the knitwear of fishermen and aran knit patterns are thought to date back over 3,000 years.

Anti-fur skin protest

Police arresting anti-fur protesters Tracy Reiman (left), an American; Anthony Jeffries (centre), from East Kent Animal Welfare, and Ingrid Newkirk, co-founder of Peta, a US-based organisation which opened a London office this month. They were held during a semi-naked protest in Regent Street, central London, yesterday.

Letter: Too hot for comfort

Sir: I have noticed that in nearly all public buildings the temperature is adjusted to be comfortable for the employees who work there.

FASHION / Night moves

BOUNDARIES are being crossed. Last spring, the international catwalks showed multiple examples of fashion's new mismatching - items not usually worn together were put together in new, fresh ways. Then came summer and a general loosening up - the return of the fluid dress, the fusion of Eastern and Western styles, the fall of the shortie skirt (though thighs made brief appearances at haute couture in July) and more breaking of rules.

Fashion: A simple dress is hard to beat: Scrunch it, roll it, crease it . . . this summer's essential dress combines easy fabrics with an enduring appeal, says Marion Hume

THE DRESS is the undisputed essential garment for this summer. The faded, floral dress, the chiffon, floaty dress, the nightdress worn layered over another nightdress in daylight hours and the second-hand dress worn with clumpy boots are already stamped as the fashion looks for summer 1993. For those who don't follow fashion slavishly, the other kind of dress - the one you love that comes out year after year the minute the temperature hints at rising - will be viewed as not just comfortable and easy this time around, but also as the height of fashion.

FASHION / Antique and old lace

AFTER austerity, opulence. In the season that has inflicted gamines and waifs on us, with their bony, boyish hips and tiny little chests, in the evening, at least, fashion is still celebrating the survival of a few womanly curves.

Fashion Update: Silk undies for all

IF YOU usually miss out on silk undies at Christmas because you do not fit in with conventional underwear sizing, the Bust Stop special size mail-order catalogue may provide a solution. The new company estimates that 11 per cent of women in this country take a bra cup D or above. Bust Stop's bras range from 30D to 32FF and up to 48GG. Styles include a silk bustier for pounds 37 and a silk Jacquard body for pounds 75, both designed by Catherine Fuller. For brochure and information, ring Libby Garside, 081-943 9733.

Acquisitions lift Sherwood despite lace problems

SHERWOOD, the lace maker, has pushed its pre-tax profits up by a quarter, helped by acquisitions and greater success in selling finished garments.

ICI swap deal 'finely balanced'

IMPERIAL Chemical Industries yesterday said it remained optimistic of going ahead with a pounds 350m asset swap with Du Pont of the United States, even though the European Commission's merger authorities are expected to block the deal.
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In this photo illustration a school student eats a hamburger as part of his lunch which was brought from a fast food shop near his school, on October 5, 2005 in London, England. The British government has announced plans to remove junk food from school lunches. From September 2006, food that is high in fat, sugar or salt will be banned from meals and removed from vending machines in schools across England. The move comes in response to a campaign by celebrity TV chef Jamie Oliver to improve school meals.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

James Frey's literary treasure hunt

Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering