Life and Style Mellow yellow: a warming spoonful of polenta

Opening a new restaurant is often a quick way for rich people to lose money. It is a gamble opening your doors to the public, just like playing poker. But as with cards, there are ways to hedge your bets. The cautious restaurateur might tend towards well-worn concepts such as the burger joint, for instance, or the fried-chicken shop.

Joe McCanta, Cocktail maker: 'A dash of bitters - orange, lemon or celery - changes a whole drink'

My Life In Food: Joe McCanta, cocktail maker

McCanta started out bar tending in New York and went on to work for Saf raw food restaurants, opening Saf Restaurant and Bar in London in 2008. He has devised the cocktails for the Grey Goose Winter Ball to benefit the Elton John AIDS Foundation tomorrow. For tickets, go to ejaf.com

Jeff Arnett, Master distiller at Jack Daniel's: '‘anywhere in the world I smell hickory, it takes me straight home'

My Life In Food: Jeff Arnett, master distiller at Jack Daniel's

'Anywhere in the world I smell hickory, it takes me straight home'

Swedish food is latest Scandinavian import to appeal to British tastes

If meatballs and a gibberish-spouting puppet chef seem unlikely ambassadors for a global gastronomic revolution then think again. Swedish chefs are leading a new Nordic invasion and this time it's no laughing matter.

Master chocolatier Cecilia Tessieri: 'Some tuscan bread,
olive oil, baby tomatoes and basil, and I'm in heaven'

My Life in Food: Cecilia Tessieri, master chocolatier

Cecilia Tessieri is one of the only female master chocolatiers in the world. She set up Amedei with her brother Alessio in 1990. She has world exclusivity to the 25 tonnes of beans grown in Chuao in Venezuela, thought to be best in the world, and has won a host of awards for her bars, including the Golden Bean from the London Academy of Chocolate. Amedei's latest product is a chocolate and hazelnut sauce and is available online at Fortnum and Mason (fortnumandmason.com).

John Whaite, winner of The Great British Bake Off

Television: How to make sure a post-Bake Off career rises

Law student John Whaite, 23, has been crowned the surprise winner of The Great British Bake Off, after impressing judges Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood with his "Heaven and Hell" chiffon cake, a monster gateau that required 18 eggs, 600 grams of dark chocolate and one kilogram of sugar. But what's for afters?

Bake Off's audience rises to new high

The Great British Bake Off saw its audience rise to a new high for last night's finale as more than seven million people watched John Whaite crowned king of the cakes.

Lisa Markwell: Why buy one, get one free, if you throw one in the bin?

Wheat supplies plummet, wheat prices to rocket: the legacy of a dismal wet summer is realised. A little part of me, the restaurant critic that can't help eating the entire bread basket before the starters appear, rejoices. If we get less bread in our diets, it's good for all of us. But – of course – that's idiotic.

Waste not, want not: The Western culture of binning food

Supermarket promotions make it easy for us to buy more than we need, but it means we end up throwing away far too much.

Rant & Rave (07/10/12)

Rant

My Life in Food: Alejandro Bello

'I learnt to love caribbean food when I was growing up in venezuela'
Chef Sat Bains has a the first two Michelin stars in Nottingham

My life in food: Sat Bains

Chef Sat Bains started his career helping to set up Raymond Blanc's first brasserie, Le Petit Blanc. After a spell at restaurant du jour L'Escargot, he won the Roux brothers' scholarship and went off to work at the three-Michelin-starred Le Jardin des Sens in the South of France. His self-titled restaurant in Nottingham has two Michelin stars, the first awarded to a restaurant in the city.

Richard Bertinet, the author of four books, runs a cookery school, and a bakery: 'Bread feeds the soul and the body. I could be happy living on bread and water'

My Life In Food: Richard Bertinet

'Bread feeds the soul and the body. I could be happy living on bread and water'

Dock Kitchen, Portobello Dock, 342-344 Ladbroke Grove, London

It's funny how just walking into the Dock Kitchen makes you feel trendy. Perhaps it's the neighbours. Stevie Parle's dockside restaurant is part (easily the largest part) of an industrial complex. Lurking beneath it, like a chic troll, is the designer Tom Dixon's studio, while next door is the HQ of Innocent, the smoothies firm.

The Weekend's Viewing: Exploring China: a Culinary Adventure, Sun, BBC2
The Zoo, Sun, ITV1

Exploring China: a Culinary Adventure is presented by a veritable Marco Polo of kitchen equipment, a heroic figure who ventured East and on his return transformed the cooking techniques of the Occident.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine