Voices John Tavener at Bridgewater Hall as part of Manchester International Festival

More establishment than experimental, classifying the late composer is no easy task

Classical: Still so controversial, still so new

For some, Berlioz is the world's greatest composer, for others he is scarcely a musician. Bayan Northcott examines his eccentric and still hotly debated legacy

Classical: Symphony for snifflers

With the cold season's arrival, Ian Pillow retunes his ear to the concert sneeze

Give over, Beethoven!

Musicians in top orchestras fear they'll go deaf as instruments get ever louder, reports Louise Jury

Classical: Don't give up the evening job

With 26 gerbils to support, viola-player Ian Pillow tries his hand at journalism

Disney to remake the cartoon of the century

DISNEY IS to remake for the first time its classic 1940 movie Fantasia, which combined animation and classical music.

Classical: Emotion, passion and distance

The Dutch composer Louis Andriessen has influenced a generation, but his muscular music has never been heard at the Proms before. That's about to change.

Edinburgh Festival - Dance: Jewels in the NY crown

New York City Ballet

Classical: 1,000 years of Auntie

PROMS 3&4 ROYAL ALBERT HALL LONDON

The Weasel: No stopping Germaine and me at Henley

I never previously thought I had that much in common with Germaine Greer, but now I realise that the feminist icon and I are birds of a feather. We were both excluded from the Stewards' Enclosure at Henley Royal Regatta for failing to comply with the stringent dress code - and we both managed to gain admission by clever improvisation.

DANCE: EVENT OF THE WEEK

Nederlands Dans Theater Mon to Thur Sadler's Wells, London EC1

Obituary: Paul Sacher

WHEN PAUL Sacher conducted the London Mozart Players in December 1993, in London, he was returning to a city in which he had made his debut in 1938 (at a concert of the International Society for Contemporary Music) and he ended his programme with a work he had commissioned in 1940 - Martinu's Double Concerto for strings, piano and percussion.

Obituary: James Blades

JAMES BLADES was one of the best loved and most naturally talented musicians to grace the British orchestral scene over the past 60 years. He brought the skills and art of great percussion playing to a wide public not only through his performing ability but through his extraordinary talent in communication with people from all walks of life. He was kindly and encouraging to the first efforts of the smallest child and he advised composers like Igor Stravinsky. He was a close friend of Benjamin Britten, who turned to him constantly for advice on percussion techniques and special sounds such as creating the unique instruments for the church operas - "you know what I mean Jimmy"; and he did!

Classical music: The self-created composer

Between 1909 and 1923 the young Igor Stravinksy composed his four great Russian ballets - The Firebird, Petrushka, The Rite of Spring and The Wedding. In the process he transformed both himself and 20th-century music.

The Compact Collection: Rob Cowan on the Week's CD Releases

A DELECTABLE recipe of fairy dust and aural honey casts a potent spell in the Mendelssohn-Korngold score for Warner Brothers' 1934 film of A Midsummer Night's Dream. This was the first of Erich Wolfgang Korngold's scores for Hollywood; the director was Max Rheinhardt (it was his only completed sound film), and the stars included James Cagney, Dick Powell and a fledgling Olivia de Havilland. CPO's newly recorded CD (featuring an accomplished Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin) salvages the main body of the score and includes sundry items that never made it to celluloid.

Still small voice of calm

No thundering Wotan here... John Tomlinson is back. And this time it's stately.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor