Arts and Entertainment

You might assume that the participants in the BBC4 documentary God's Cadets: Joining the Salvation Army would all be classic "lark" types, but there was a greater variety of personality than expected in this 90-minute film. It followed the pious, but not pompous "cadets" who had given up their lives to enter into two years of intensive officer training at the William Booth College in south London.

Bad boys, good sports

Alison Benjamin on a variant of zero tolerance

Clubbing: Milk 'n' 2 Sugars at The Cross, Kings Cross

Milk 'n' 2 Sugars at The Cross, Kings Cross, Goods Way (off York Way) N1 (0171-837 0828) 30 May, 10pm-6am, pounds 9 advance/pounds 10 members/pounds 12 others

Gang of boys 'raped tourist out on stroll'

A gang of eight boys aged between 14 and 17 "violently and repeatedly" raped an Austrian tourist visiting London and then hurled her naked into a canal, a jury was told yesterday.

Final blow as King's Cross victim is left with huge bill

His face is a mask of scar tissue, his hands are so severely burnt that he can no longer play the guitar and keyboards, and his voice is too damaged to sing. He is laughed at wherever he goes.

Unmasked: survivor of King's Cross fire goes before judge to claim damages for scars that will never heal

He was the man in the mask, the King's Cross fire survivor so badly burnt that his face needed a shield against the world in order to heal.

Healthy school dinners - chips with every serving as long as they're not crinkle-cut

Children's favourite school dinner - chips - may stay on the menu but they should be thick or oven-cooked, according to the first government guidelines on school meals for 17 years. They should also be straight rather than crinkle-cut, because straight chips absorb less fat.

Lunch date with Mr Major could be a journey too far

Ben Summers and George Wright trace the public transport routes four Cabinet members would make to Great Stukeley for Saturday lunch with the Prime Minister

Leading Article: A shameful intolerance

When Margaret Thatcher addressed herself to Christian compassion many years ago, there was some concern that she had not got it quite right. "No one would have remembered the Good Samaritan, if he'd only had good intentions," she remarked in 1980. "He had money as well." Christians will have been even more surprised, then, by revised thinking on the matter at Westminster last week. The Good Samaritan, had he been really good, would not have been rushing about with pieces of gold at all. He would have bellowed: "You're damned intolerable! Now be up out of that gutter and on your way, man, before I call the police." Had David MacLean MP been passing by, the Tory Scot might have added: "And get back to Scotland while you're about it." John Prescott, bless his bleeding heart, would probably have bought the fellow a cup of tea. But give him money? When a BBC interviewer suggested last week that he had once been spotted handing a beggar pounds 5, the Labour deputy could scarcely have been more insulted had he been accused of frightening commuters at King's Cross.

Zero patrol: at home with the shuffling poor

Andy Beckett joins police at King's Cross and finds there's more to law enforcement than slogans

Why should anyone assume that new architecture and old music cannot be compatible?

The Coliseum is an oddball building in London's St Martin's Lane leading down to Trafalgar Square. It was designed by Frank Matcham (Hackney Empire, London Hippodrome, Victoria Palace) in a showbiz Baroque style, borrowing a little from Wren's Royal Naval Hospital, Greenwich, and opened as a music hall in 1904. It is not a particularly fine building, but like all Matcham's designs it is warm, engaging and rather lovable.

The big issue? Safer streets

Suzanne Moore recommends zero tolerance for liberal critics of Tony Blair's support for a US-style clampdown on petty crime, while Jason Bennetto examines whether such tactics by the police actually work

Homeless refuse to clear off the streets for Blair

Beggars say zero tolerance regime pushes problem to another area

Cross-Channel sibling has kept to the storyline

The new British Library may not be much outside, but it is a better building, writes Jonathan Glancey

Letter: Begging question

Sir: Sign at King's Cross Underground station in London: "Beware of professional beggars." Are we to understand that there are amateur beggars who just do it for love?

A bad blow for the Kosh

DANCE
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Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
general election 2015
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The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
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Life and Style
Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
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Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
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Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
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An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
voicesDave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
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Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
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Buyers of secondhand cars are searching out shades last seen in cop show ‘The Sweeney’
motoringFlares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own