News The charity Stonewall revealed its Top 100 Employers list on Wednesday

Organisations to receive recognition from the charity include an NHS Trust, and a housing company

255th anniversary of the British Museum: Google Doodle celebrates institution's opening

Google has celebrated the 255th anniversary of the British Museum with a Doodle on its search page.

It's a date: 10 best diaries

They come in all shapes and sizes and range from discreet to eye-catching orange calfskin. With one of these diaries, you need never miss an appointment

In the studio: Alan Johnston, artist

'I was extending an ever-present engagement with the creation of shadow'

Stop taking tablets: the new scourge of iPads in galleries

The national appetite for art and art spaces seems insatiable. When Tate Modern was unveiled in 2000, two million annual visits were expected; today more than five million visitors a year pour through its Thames-side doors.

Architects Peter St John and Adam Caruso have revitalised The Tate's entrance, cafe and gallery spaces in a £45 million refurbishment project

Tate Britain's redesign: It may not be cool but it’s restrained, and elegant, and it works

The transformation of Tate Britain’s core building will seem effortless to many

Tate Britain's new lower level rotunda. Courtesy Caruso St John and Tate

Tate Britain unveils £45m refurbishment

The latest makeover won’t make Tate Britain 'cool', but it has become far more welcoming and architecturally elegant

Coming soon in film: Le Corsaire, Romeo and Juliet and Rambert

Autumnal gloom may be descending, but cinematically there are manifold reasons to be cheerful, as the studios stem the stream of comic-book blockbusters (next week’s Thor sequel excepted) and wheel out their prestige fare on the hunt for some of next year’s Oscars. 

Coming soon in dance: Le Corsaire, Romeo and Juliet and Rambert

With every Cabinet reshuffle it’s a while before new incumbents make their mark. And so it is in the world of dance. Big changes at the top – the Royal Ballet, English National Ballet, and Scottish Ballet all gained new directors last year – are only now beginning to register, as long-laid production plans come to fruition.

Coming soon in classical: Big things by Britten, Strauss and Verdi

Benjamin Britten dominates programming in the weeks before the centenary of his birth next month. This Saturday, at the Royal Festival Hall, Vladimir Jurowski conducts the London Philharmonic Choir and Orchestra in the War Requiem. Soloists include quintessential Britten tenor Ian Bostridge.

Mr Dadson has become the UK's oldest graduate

Britain's oldest graduate: 'Suduko and crosswords seemed a bit non-productive'

93-year-old man earns arts degree from Open University

A 37m-long Viking warship is coming to the British Museum

IKEA, Viking-style: longboat to arrive at British Museum in 'flat pack'

Huge wooden warship dubbed the Norse 'weapon of mass destruction' at the centre of new exhibition dispelling 'fluffy bunny' scholarship on Vikings

Curve your enthusiasm: the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in Hyde Park

The new Serpentine Sackler Gallery: A modern classic takes shape

Zaha Hadid's new creation is unveiled tomorrow. It shows how to update but not upstage a revered building, says Jay Merrick

Girl Reading (Malala Yousafazi) by Jonathan Yeo is to go on show at the National Portrait Gallery

Jonathan Yeo painting of Malala Yousafzai unveiled at National Portrait Gallery

Yeo says he hopes the painting reflects 'the slight paradox of someone with enormous power yet vulnerability and youth at the same time'

Art Under Attack (Tate Britain, 2 Oct to 5 Jan) examines 500 years of assaults on work for religious, political or aesthetic reasons

Coming soon in visual arts: From Australia to Margate

Australia: so much to see, so far to travel. Hence the most satisfying thing about this autumn's calendar is news that a bunch of top curators have edited 200 years of the nation's art and are delivering it to our doorsteps for £14 a ticket. Australia at the Royal Academy, London (21 Sept to 8 Dec), features work by settlers and indigenous people and, best of all, includes four paintings from Sidney Nolan's Ned Kelly series, the source of much mythology and fame.

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