Arts and Entertainment

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

Dimbleby visited the Vagabond tattoo studio in east London, followed by cameramen for the 30-minute procedure

David Dimbleby gets inked: so what exactly does a tattoo even mean anymore?

There are many parallels of tattoo significance: Sexy/chavvy, body art/body graffiti, rebellious/criminal

Robbie Williams has said he's 'gutted' Radio 1 won't play his singles

Robbie Williams 'gutted' Radio 1 won't play his singles

The singer was declared irrelevant to Radio 1's young audience earlier this year

Don't let skills of the elderly go to waste

We would view it as a tragedy if young people were left to languish

James Earl Jones and Vanessa Redgrave in Much Ado About Nothing

Theatre review: Much Ado About Nothing

James Earl Jones and Vanessa Redgrave fail to sparkle

Loneliness, relationship problems and money troubles: The Samaritans reveal what is troubling modern man

One in four men who rang the Samaritans talked about their feelings of loneliness or isolation, the emergency counselling service disclosed last night.

Young men aged between 15 and 24 were particularly vulnerable

Spike in suicide rate in Europe and US linked to financial crisis

UK registered 300 deaths above the expected rate in 2009, after start of crisis

Gavin Henson, left, grew steadily more influential on his first start for Bath

Gavin Henson capitalises on Bath’s display of coaching strength

Bath’s high-profile coaching group led by Gary Gold arrived midway through 2012, so by necessity they spent last season, when the Rec crew finished seventh out of 12 in the Premiership, juggling their predecessors’ resources. Not any more. As Matt Banahan, the scorer of Bath’s second try in Saturday’s 27-20 win over Leicester, put it: “You have always got a settling in period with coaches and with players. Coaches obviously want their squad and the players they want to come in, and sometimes they are working with players when they would rather have different ones. So this year we have had that teething out of the way and we have got a squad we want to build on.”

The only way is up: Men's average height 'up 11cm since 1870s'

Men have grown at the rate of approximately a millimetre a year and a centimetre a decade

DVD: Love Is All You Need

It may be an Abba-free zone, but this sweet Mediterranean romance has so much in common with Mamma Mia (Pierce Brosnan included) that it could have been marketed as a remake.

Jason Crookes: The Hull outside back ran in a hat-trick last night

Wigan 33 Hull 34 match report: Jason Crookes leads way as Hull make amends for Wembley loss

Two late drop goals from Daniel Holdsworth prevented Wigan from showing that whatever their Challenge Cup-winning senior players can do to Hull, their young reserves can do too.

The tell-tale signs of becoming middle-aged

All I know is that, when I was in my twenties, I'd look at someone in his fifties and think he was really, really old

Leading rail firm First Great Western accused over 'secret 11% fare hike'

A leading rail firm has been accused of secretly increasing advance rail fares by over 11%.

Book review: The Asylum, By John Harwood

“I am Miss Georgina Ferrars  of Gresham’s Yard, London. I am. I swear that I am. And I shall prove it.”

Police respond to the the ‘terror attack’

Panic on the streets of Birmingham: City responds to mock terror attack

Exercise tests if there are cultural differences in responding to instructions from emergency services

Paperback review: Mutton, By India Knight

At the centre of India Knight's novel is 46-year-old Clara Hutt. Clara is content with her lot, until a friend, Gaby, moves back to London from Los Angeles looking 10 years younger. Her secret is cosmetic surgery – lots of it – and Clara is tempted to give it a try.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk