Arts and Entertainment Jake Bugg burst onto the scene aged 18

The success of Jake Bugg and Ben Howard has given rise to a new wave of male singer-songwriters who are queueing up to show off their sensitive sides

Album: Glasvegas, Euphoric Heartbreak (Columbia)

Are you lonesome tonight? Are you missing someone so much you're losing your mind? James Allan is.

Album: Robbie Robertson, How to Become Clairvoyant (429)

On his first album in 13 years, Robbie Robertson resumes his fascination with the great American mythos.

Album: Gregory Porter, Water (Motema)

Tipped by Jamie Cullum as one to watch, Porter is a deep-voiced vocalist from Bakersfield, California. There's an obvious debt to Kurt Elling but Porter seems relatively unbound by technique, sounding less mannered and more soulful as a result.

Album: Schubert, Fibonacci Sequence (Deux-Elles)

Composed in 1824 between Death and the Maiden and the Ninth Symphony, the Octet, scored for string quartet plus clarinet, bassoon, horn and double bass, is a leisurely and sunny respite between demanding monoliths.

Album: Kassidy, Hope St. (Vertigo)

Scottish acoustic strummers Kassidy come across like a sort of McMumford & Sons on this debut album, their four-part harmonies and massed guitars rolling along with engaging verve on tracks like opener "Stray Cat", a swaggering folk-stomp subtly underpinned by funky organ.

Album: Sonia Wider-Atherton, Vita: Monteverdi/Scelsi (Naïve)

This is a strange combination of apparently contrasting composers' styles, the formal but highly emotional lines of Monteverdi's 16th-century madrigals, transcribed for cello trio, interspersed with the more austere, angular extemporisations of Scelsi's modernist "Trilogy" for solo cello.

Album: New York Dolls, Dancing Backward in High Heels (Blast)

There was a certain louche dignity to the Dolls' 2004, but this sorry affair, knocked together in a Newcastle studio with David Johansen and Sylvain Sylvain joined by Blondie guitarist Frank Infante, a pick-up rhythm section and backing singers they apparently met in the pub, is another matter.

Album: Courtney Pine, Europa (Destin-E)

Secure in his identity as an Afropean rasta, Courtney Pine is on a roll.

Album: Albrecht Mayer, Bonjour Paris (Decca)

Several of the pieces on oboist Mayer's musical portrait of Paris easily choose themselves: adaptations of Satie's Gymnopédie No 1 and Ravel's Pavane pour une Infante Défunte, along with a couple of Debussy standards – the wistful La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin and Clair de Lune, reminiscent of a moonlit stroll that beds the oboe softly among harp and woodwind. But the longer pieces reflect the paucity of showcase material: Français' L'Horloge De Flore is laboured, while D'Indy's Fantaisie sur des Thèmes Populaires Français is by turns rumbustious and portentous. But Gotthard Odermatt's Été is a delightful modern piece in the style of Ravel at his most pastoral.

Album: Yuck, Yuck (Mercury / Fat Possum)

In the early 1990s, when US guitar rock was at its high watermark, Yuck weren't born.

Tinie Tempah: He's going to be huge

Rap superstars are known for giant egos and turbocharged spending habits. But Britain's latest urban sensation plays to a different tune

Album: Orchestra of the Age of Englightenment, Monteverdi: Vespers 1610 (Signum Classics)

"Not all orchestras are the same," runs the message on the cover, and it's true: this is the second recording in about as many weeks of Monteverdi's masterwork, following L'Arpeggiata's, and clearly the superior.

Album: Bright Eyes, The People's Key (Polydor)

Conor Oberst has always been an artist to inspire, irritate and frustrate, and on what he says will be the final BE album he does these things in equal measure.

Album: Esben & the Witch, Violet Cries (Matador)

Judging by the titles on their debut album – "Argyria", "Chorea" and "Eumenides" – Brighton trio Esben and the Witch are a band who paid attention in Classics.

Album: Mama Rosin, Black Robert (Gut Feeling)

The Swiss Cajun/punk trio's third album is a little more introspective – although introspective is a relative term when it comes to these lovers of the rowdy and ramshackled.

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

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Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
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Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

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Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

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The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

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Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor