Arts and Entertainment

The Orange Prize winner Suzanne Berne is on familiar ground with her fifth novel examining life in an affluent American village. Littlefield, Massachusetts, is named one of the 10 best places to live in America. Curiously, it also houses an unusually high number of psychotherapists. Clarice Watkins, a sociologist from the University of Chicago, decides to study Littlefield to find out exactly what makes it such a good place to live. She arrives to find a town at war, split between those who want their dogs to be off the leash in the local park and those who object. Opinions become more polarised when someone starts poisoning dogs and an undercurrent of fear pulses through the community.

Overworked, over stressed, over here

Britain's professionals say work is making them ill. But what's the difference between a bad day and a breakdown? URSULA KENNY reports

Obituary: Glyn Seaborn Jones

GLYN SEABORN JONES was one of the leading figures in the world of humanistic psychotherapy in the 1970s, and the first to introduce Arthur Janov's primal scream therapy to Europe.

I didn't like my daughter. So I left

Of course a mother's not supposed to leave. But what if a child drives her away?

Letter: Ron Davies' courage

Sir: I was amazed by the fundamentalism of Mary Braid's piece on Ron Davies ("A very high-risk strategy indeed", 22 June). In viewing his sexual confusion as a tragedy and his quest for psychiatric support as some kind of denial or defence, she puts the debate about sexual orientation back by at least a decade.

Guess who's packing the bags for the family holiday

It's the last bastion of sexual inequality: he loads the car, she has to remember everything to take with them.

Help yourself to help others

Depression is, sadly, booming in the West - and so are the courses that train how to treat it.

If you really want to know why men do what they do, ask one

It's a willy thing, an inadequacy thing, a pathetic, treacherous thing, a risk thing

Smart Moves: Take advantage of your many personalities

Most self-respecting, career-minded people will have at least one self-help title on their bookshelves and maybe another, in the form of an audio-book, in their car.

Dando Murder: Murder may have been work of professional hitman

THE MANNER of Jill Dando's death led to suspicion last night that her killer was a professional hitman.

Dando Murder: Dando had been pestered by stalker for four years

IF SHE was murdered by a stalker then Jill Dando's planned wedding this autumn was probably the trigger, a leading doctor said yesterday.

Health: The dark side of the mood

So sulking is not just an annoying habit, it's a personality disorder. By Roger Dobson

Column: A good idea from ... Freud

THE OTHER night, at a party, I bumped into a beautiful woman called Rachel who was in the kitchen looking for a drink. She was about 29, had shoulder-length brown hair, pale skin and watery blue eyes - and it soon became obvious that she was very much in love with me. I noticed this early on in the conversation. There was something in the way she said "cranberry juice" when I asked her what she wanted to drink which proved the strength of her desire. And when she abruptly ended our short chat, saying, "I've got to go and join my boyfriend in the next room, bye," and walked out quickly (or ran out), there was no longer any doubt about the depth of her love for me.

Letter: Ethical therapy

DR RAJ PERSAUD quite rightly brings the attention of your readers to the dangers inherent in the largely unregulated world of therapeutic treatments ("Trust me, I'm a shrink", Real Life, 14 March). However, Dr Persaud seems unaware that the professional training organisations are acutely aware of the need to ensure that their members adhere to the highest ethical standards.

Deadliest shopping species is the male

RESEARCHERS HAVE utilised "spies" and spent five years video- taping thousands of consumers to identify for retailers the seven definitive types of British shopper.

Obituary: Mary Edwardes

MARY EDWARDES made herself the queen scourge of unethical professionals. Whether they were priests, psychotherapists or doctors and whether caught with zips undone or ethics in a twist, Edwardes was remorselessly effective both in supporting their victims and in demanding justice.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project