i Penny Mordaunt, Conservative MP

Someone’s about to make a Splash!

Art expert attacks restoration works

ONE OF the most respected scholars of Renaissance art has spoken out against the world-wide mania for restoring works of art - notably, the brighter-than-bright colours following the cleaning of the Michelangelo frescos in the Sistine Chapel, Rome, and what he describes as a 'much-damaged' Uccello in the National Gallery, London.

Monuments from City of London's past laid low by renovations at historic building

Two of the marble busts of past dignitaries of the City of London that have been temporarily displaced to the carpet of Mansion House during refurbishment work at the building. They feature Sir John Sylvester, Recorder of London, 1803-1822 (left) and Sir David Salomond, Lord Mayor of London in 1855.

Bottom Line: MFI seeking a recovery formula

IT SEEMS that MFI is running out of excuses for its failure to boost turnover. Yesterday it attributed a poor January sales season partly to the ending of the Government's stamp duty holiday. But that ended in mid-August, which should have given buyers enough time to move houses and plan renovations before the sales started.

Repair fund 'surplus' irks sheltered owners: Service charges in warden-supervised homes have angered residents

WYN MARTIN, 74, lives in a complex of 35 warden-supervised flats and bungalows managed by Guardian Housing Association. She likes her flat and is full of praise for the warden and the way the properties are maintained.

City File: Shanks & McEwan to face flak

Shanks & McEwan, the Glasgow-based waste-management company, will have to face a certain amount of flak at its finals this Thursday. In June, it announced a pounds 19.3m charge against its 1992-93 profits to cover debts and reconstruction of its contracting arm. Given profits of only pounds 2.32m last year, the division has exceeded even the core business in its ability to sink stuff in holes in the ground.

Spending 7,000 pounds can be a hard job: It is difficult to kick-start the economy if nobody wants your money, writes Richard Shepperd

MY WIFE and I like to think that we have the vestiges of a social conscience. But those vestiges became a lot more vestigial when, last year, about pounds 7,000 unexpectedly came our way via damages for a car crash and an unexpected tax refund. 'Good,' we thought, winding up our 78 of the 'Red Flag', 'let's use it to kick-start the economy.' This meant that we decided to have various things mended (roof, fences, electrics), cleaned (windows) or done (interior decoration) that we couldn't afford before. 'No problem there,' we said, 'loads of people queuing up to do this kind of work during a recession.'

Man in death plunge clung to ledge for 20 minutes

First Edition

Nuclear company dismisses manager: Sacking 'is linked to inquiry into funds'

A SENIOR manager at British Nuclear Fuels' headquarters in Risley, Cheshire, has been dismissed following an internal investigation into alleged misappropriation of the state-owned company's funds.

Corruption blamed on council's deficiencies

LAMBETH council's chief executive last night accepted some of the blame for allowing corruption and malpractice that cost the south London borough pounds 10m over the past 10 years.

Heywood dives after price cuts

HEYWOOD Williams, the glass distributor exposed to domestic housing and commercial building, yesterday reported sharply reduced half-year profits and said it foresaw no end to recession, writes Robert Cole.

Kew restoration

The 140-year-old water-lily house at Kew Gardens, south- west London, officially reopens today after a 12-month closure for repairs. The house has been restored to its original iron and glass form and has been re- soiled and planted with the aim of extending the flowering display to 11 months a year.

Weekend Gardening Update: Transformation of a restoration dream

ON FRIDAY you can see the first of two programmes about a very different restoration project - the transformation of the garden of a 14th-century French manor house. It was the mad dream of garden designer Alan Mason. See him at work on Channel 4 at 9.30pm.

Mystery of painting's miraculous escape

IT ALMOST qualifies as a second miracle. The first miracle, of course, is depicted in the massive painting Le Nozze di Cana, with Christ changing the water into wine. The new miracle is that, when scaffolding crashed into the picture (value between pounds 50m and pounds 100m), the five resulting rips managed to miss every one of the 130 people painted by Veronese. One rip was said to be almost a metre long.
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee