i Penny Mordaunt, Conservative MP

Someone’s about to make a Splash!

Art expert attacks restoration works

ONE OF the most respected scholars of Renaissance art has spoken out against the world-wide mania for restoring works of art - notably, the brighter-than-bright colours following the cleaning of the Michelangelo frescos in the Sistine Chapel, Rome, and what he describes as a 'much-damaged' Uccello in the National Gallery, London.

Monuments from City of London's past laid low by renovations at historic building

Two of the marble busts of past dignitaries of the City of London that have been temporarily displaced to the carpet of Mansion House during refurbishment work at the building. They feature Sir John Sylvester, Recorder of London, 1803-1822 (left) and Sir David Salomond, Lord Mayor of London in 1855.

Bottom Line: MFI seeking a recovery formula

IT SEEMS that MFI is running out of excuses for its failure to boost turnover. Yesterday it attributed a poor January sales season partly to the ending of the Government's stamp duty holiday. But that ended in mid-August, which should have given buyers enough time to move houses and plan renovations before the sales started.

Repair fund 'surplus' irks sheltered owners: Service charges in warden-supervised homes have angered residents

WYN MARTIN, 74, lives in a complex of 35 warden-supervised flats and bungalows managed by Guardian Housing Association. She likes her flat and is full of praise for the warden and the way the properties are maintained.

City File: Shanks & McEwan to face flak

Shanks & McEwan, the Glasgow-based waste-management company, will have to face a certain amount of flak at its finals this Thursday. In June, it announced a pounds 19.3m charge against its 1992-93 profits to cover debts and reconstruction of its contracting arm. Given profits of only pounds 2.32m last year, the division has exceeded even the core business in its ability to sink stuff in holes in the ground.

Spending 7,000 pounds can be a hard job: It is difficult to kick-start the economy if nobody wants your money, writes Richard Shepperd

MY WIFE and I like to think that we have the vestiges of a social conscience. But those vestiges became a lot more vestigial when, last year, about pounds 7,000 unexpectedly came our way via damages for a car crash and an unexpected tax refund. 'Good,' we thought, winding up our 78 of the 'Red Flag', 'let's use it to kick-start the economy.' This meant that we decided to have various things mended (roof, fences, electrics), cleaned (windows) or done (interior decoration) that we couldn't afford before. 'No problem there,' we said, 'loads of people queuing up to do this kind of work during a recession.'

Man in death plunge clung to ledge for 20 minutes

First Edition

Nuclear company dismisses manager: Sacking 'is linked to inquiry into funds'

A SENIOR manager at British Nuclear Fuels' headquarters in Risley, Cheshire, has been dismissed following an internal investigation into alleged misappropriation of the state-owned company's funds.

Corruption blamed on council's deficiencies

LAMBETH council's chief executive last night accepted some of the blame for allowing corruption and malpractice that cost the south London borough pounds 10m over the past 10 years.

Heywood dives after price cuts

HEYWOOD Williams, the glass distributor exposed to domestic housing and commercial building, yesterday reported sharply reduced half-year profits and said it foresaw no end to recession, writes Robert Cole.

Kew restoration

The 140-year-old water-lily house at Kew Gardens, south- west London, officially reopens today after a 12-month closure for repairs. The house has been restored to its original iron and glass form and has been re- soiled and planted with the aim of extending the flowering display to 11 months a year.

Weekend Gardening Update: Transformation of a restoration dream

ON FRIDAY you can see the first of two programmes about a very different restoration project - the transformation of the garden of a 14th-century French manor house. It was the mad dream of garden designer Alan Mason. See him at work on Channel 4 at 9.30pm.

Mystery of painting's miraculous escape

IT ALMOST qualifies as a second miracle. The first miracle, of course, is depicted in the massive painting Le Nozze di Cana, with Christ changing the water into wine. The new miracle is that, when scaffolding crashed into the picture (value between pounds 50m and pounds 100m), the five resulting rips managed to miss every one of the 130 people painted by Veronese. One rip was said to be almost a metre long.
News
The Banksy image in Folkestone before it was vandalised
people
Life and Style
tech

Sales of the tablet are set to fall again, say analysts

Sport
football West Brom vs Man Utd match report: Blind grabs point, but away form a problem for Van Gaal
Arts and Entertainment
Gotham is coming to UK shores this autumn
tvGotham, episode 2, review
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Bloom Time: Mira Sorvino
tvMira Sorvino on leaving movie roles for 'The Intruders'
News
Brian Harvey turned up at Downing Street today demanding to speak to the Prime Minister
news

Met Police confirm there was a 'minor disturbance' and that no-one was arrested

Arts and Entertainment
George Lucas poses with a group of Star Wars-inspired Disney characters at Disney's Hollywood Studios in 2010
films

George Lucas criticises the major Hollywood film studios

Voices
Chris Grayling, Justice Secretary: 'There are pressures which we are facing but there is not a crisis'
voices

Does Chris Grayling realise what a vague concept he is dealing with?

Life and Style
A street vendor in Mexico City sells Dorilocos, which are topped with carrot, jimaca, cucumber, peanuts, pork rinds, spices and hot sauce
food + drink

Trend which requires crisps, a fork and a strong stomach is sweeping Mexico's streets

Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Vietnam & Cambodia
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Bruges
India & Nepal
Japan
Berlin, Dresden, Meissen & Colditz
Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album
Hugh Bonneville & Peter James: 'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'

How We Met: Hugh Bonneville & Peter James

'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's heavenly crab dishes don't need hours of preparation

Bill Granger's heavenly crab recipes

Scared off by the strain of shelling a crab? Let a fishmonger do the hard work so you can focus on getting the flavours right
Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

After a remarkable conversion from reckless defender to prolific striker, Monaco's ace says he wants to make his loan deal at Old Trafford permanent
Terry Venables: Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England

Terry Venables column

Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England
The Inside Word: Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past

Michael Calvin's Inside Word

Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past