i Penny Mordaunt, Conservative MP

Someone’s about to make a Splash!

Art expert attacks restoration works

ONE OF the most respected scholars of Renaissance art has spoken out against the world-wide mania for restoring works of art - notably, the brighter-than-bright colours following the cleaning of the Michelangelo frescos in the Sistine Chapel, Rome, and what he describes as a 'much-damaged' Uccello in the National Gallery, London.

Monuments from City of London's past laid low by renovations at historic building

Two of the marble busts of past dignitaries of the City of London that have been temporarily displaced to the carpet of Mansion House during refurbishment work at the building. They feature Sir John Sylvester, Recorder of London, 1803-1822 (left) and Sir David Salomond, Lord Mayor of London in 1855.

Bottom Line: MFI seeking a recovery formula

IT SEEMS that MFI is running out of excuses for its failure to boost turnover. Yesterday it attributed a poor January sales season partly to the ending of the Government's stamp duty holiday. But that ended in mid-August, which should have given buyers enough time to move houses and plan renovations before the sales started.

Repair fund 'surplus' irks sheltered owners: Service charges in warden-supervised homes have angered residents

WYN MARTIN, 74, lives in a complex of 35 warden-supervised flats and bungalows managed by Guardian Housing Association. She likes her flat and is full of praise for the warden and the way the properties are maintained.

City File: Shanks & McEwan to face flak

Shanks & McEwan, the Glasgow-based waste-management company, will have to face a certain amount of flak at its finals this Thursday. In June, it announced a pounds 19.3m charge against its 1992-93 profits to cover debts and reconstruction of its contracting arm. Given profits of only pounds 2.32m last year, the division has exceeded even the core business in its ability to sink stuff in holes in the ground.

Spending 7,000 pounds can be a hard job: It is difficult to kick-start the economy if nobody wants your money, writes Richard Shepperd

MY WIFE and I like to think that we have the vestiges of a social conscience. But those vestiges became a lot more vestigial when, last year, about pounds 7,000 unexpectedly came our way via damages for a car crash and an unexpected tax refund. 'Good,' we thought, winding up our 78 of the 'Red Flag', 'let's use it to kick-start the economy.' This meant that we decided to have various things mended (roof, fences, electrics), cleaned (windows) or done (interior decoration) that we couldn't afford before. 'No problem there,' we said, 'loads of people queuing up to do this kind of work during a recession.'

Man in death plunge clung to ledge for 20 minutes

First Edition

Nuclear company dismisses manager: Sacking 'is linked to inquiry into funds'

A SENIOR manager at British Nuclear Fuels' headquarters in Risley, Cheshire, has been dismissed following an internal investigation into alleged misappropriation of the state-owned company's funds.

Corruption blamed on council's deficiencies

LAMBETH council's chief executive last night accepted some of the blame for allowing corruption and malpractice that cost the south London borough pounds 10m over the past 10 years.

Heywood dives after price cuts

HEYWOOD Williams, the glass distributor exposed to domestic housing and commercial building, yesterday reported sharply reduced half-year profits and said it foresaw no end to recession, writes Robert Cole.

Kew restoration

The 140-year-old water-lily house at Kew Gardens, south- west London, officially reopens today after a 12-month closure for repairs. The house has been restored to its original iron and glass form and has been re- soiled and planted with the aim of extending the flowering display to 11 months a year.

Weekend Gardening Update: Transformation of a restoration dream

ON FRIDAY you can see the first of two programmes about a very different restoration project - the transformation of the garden of a 14th-century French manor house. It was the mad dream of garden designer Alan Mason. See him at work on Channel 4 at 9.30pm.

Mystery of painting's miraculous escape

IT ALMOST qualifies as a second miracle. The first miracle, of course, is depicted in the massive painting Le Nozze di Cana, with Christ changing the water into wine. The new miracle is that, when scaffolding crashed into the picture (value between pounds 50m and pounds 100m), the five resulting rips managed to miss every one of the 130 people painted by Veronese. One rip was said to be almost a metre long.
Arts and Entertainment
books
Voices
Caustic she may be, but Joan Rivers is a feminist hero, whether she likes it or not
voicesShe's an inspiration, whether she likes it or not, says Ellen E Jones
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Sport
Diego Costa
footballEverton 3 Chelsea 6: Diego Costa double has manager purring
Life and Style
3D printed bump keys can access almost any lock
techSoftware needs photo of lock and not much more
Arts and Entertainment
The 'three chords and the truth gal' performing at the Cornbury Music Festival, Oxford, earlier this summer
music... so how did she become country music's hottest new star?
Life and Style
The spy mistress-general: A lecturer in nutritional therapy in her modern life, Heather Rosa favours a Byzantine look topped off with a squid and a schooner
fashionEurope's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln
News
Dr Alice Roberts in front of a
peopleAlice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
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Star turns: Montacute House
tv
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution