Landlord driving you mad?

... Then you are not alone. As the recession bites, tenants and buyers are lodging a record number of complaints against property professionals. Graham Norwood investigates

The Cat in The Hat, Cottesloe Theatre, London

I wonder how far Katie Mitchell's four-year-old daughter Edie appreciates that it's not everybody's mother who can devise a theatrical Christmas treat for you – one which can also be shared with friends and paying guests of all ages in the country's leading venue.

Photographers 'should not be stopped without reason'

Police officers should not use counter-terrorism laws to stop people taking photographs in public, a senior officer said today.

Public finances: Darling's impossible battle to climb a mountain of debt

Although Alistair Darling's projections for public borrowing are not quite as horrifying as some City economists had been predicting a few months ago, the Government's plans remain the largest peacetime programme of deficit financing in British history, and the most ambitious in the Western world. They also seem inadequate to the task of allaying market fears about the safety of the UK's international credit ratings.

Caught in the Net: Russell comes back to life

The best song I've heard this week is a previously unreleased track recorded by Arthur Russell (left). Best known as a pioneering disco producer in New York in the 1970s and 1980s, Russell fell into obscurity before his death from an AIDS-related condition in 1992, but his reputation has been ressurrected with numerous releases in the last ten years. Alongside disco, his instrument of choice was the cello, while also he tried his hand at pop music and all manner of experimental and avant-garde musical endeavours. He left behind 1,000 tapes of his work, so there is still music to be unearthed, like this folky track, "Come To Life". Channelling Nick Drake, the song has gorgeous vocals from Russell and an unnamed female singer, with a lilting electric guitar and a great horn section popping up here and there. It was recently released as a limited edition split seven-inch vinyl single with the debut song by CANT, a side project of Grizzly Bear's Chris Taylor. The track is streaming on the Gorrilla vs Bear site, found at tinyurl.com/yfyu5ks, and the MP3 can be purchased at tinyurl.com/yheuck6.

Public borrowing surges to record peacetime high

The Treasury borrowed almost £15bn in September, more than any other government has before for that month in peace time.

Bank waits but the City expects more drama next month

Speculation that weak economy will force another round of quantitative easing

Online property search: The DIY sellers

The rise of the online property search is challenging high street house sellers, as large fees and poor service encourage a new breed of savvy do-it-yourself vendors to cut out the middle man. Miranda Bryant reports

Mother Courage and her Children, Olivier Theatre, London

Smitten by this hyena of war

Why paying to work is Britain's hottest new holiday idea

Dry stone walling, bog restoration, willow weaving – they're cheap, fun and good for the environment

Students conned by internet 'landlord scam'

Students seeking accommodation are being warned about a bogus landlord scam on the internet.

The National, Royal Festival Hall, London

Fans of indie-rock band The National, evangelical though they may be about the band, like to think of themselves as part of a secret club. After all, the band spent years playing to cult crowds. Perhaps it will be surprising to them above all others to hear tonight's show from the Brooklyn band sold out in just three minutes.

ITV sells Friends Reunited after £105m loss

ITV today announced the sale of its Friends Reunited business as it reported a £105 million half-year loss.

Parliamentary inquiries pile further pressure on Phillips

Conservatives threaten to overhaul equalities watchdog if they win next election

The Black Album, National Theatre, London

It lives on the page but it dies on the stage. That, alas, is the story of Hanif Kureishi's second brilliant novel, The Black Album, which in 1995 picked up on the Salman Rushdie fatwah and the rising cultural phenomenon of British Muslim fundamentalism while cracking open the whole issue of what should form the basis of a liberal, multicultural education programme.

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