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The Week in Radio: Jazz man Soweto Kinch's city tour captured

A documentary on Birmingham? Thanks but no thanks, I thought to myself while pondering the new series of Reimagining the City. Seriously, Birmingham? It's hardly Florence or Cairo or Cape Town. No one nudges their partner on a soggy January morning and says wistfully, "Darling, wouldn't it be just lovely if we could leave all this behind and disappear to Birmingham?"

Green Day, Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London

“Bad news, guys. Billie Joe has got laryngitis. But I’m here!” said drummer Tre Cool, taking centre stage before singing a solo rude version of “All By Myself”, thus setting the tone for an evening of nostalgic messing around.

Album: Lee Konitz, Live at Birdland (ECM)

That alto saxophonist Konitz plays as well as he does at 82 years of age is remarkable, but that doesn't mean you want to hear this 2009 recording very often, despite the contributions of Brad Mehldau, Charlie Haden and Paul Motian. Always an eccentric soloist, Kontiz's ideas seem as fresh as ever but a lack of puff renders his tone thin and weedy.

Album: James Farm, James Farm (Nonesuch)

Star saxman Joshua Redman's new band is a "collaborative" quartet (Aaron Parks, Matt Penman, Eric Harland) who cleave to a strikingly Euro-sounding aesthetic.

Album: Denys Baptiste, Identity by Subtraction (Dune)

Tenor saxophonist Baptiste follows Let Freedom Ring!, his Martin Luther King dedication from 2003, with a more questioning reflection on "life's experience as a black man of Caribbean descent, playing jazz music in the UK".

Independent Classical podcast: Sally Beamish

Sally Beamish knows what it's like to be right at the centre of an orchestra. As a violist she was always in the thick of things; as a composer she's there again, only inside her head.

Album: Charlie Haden Quartet West, Sophisticated Ladies (Emarcy)

You can't knock the sheer class of this major-label grand production matching bassist Haden's film noir-inspired quartet – one of the best groups of the past 20 years – with guest singers Cassandra Wilson, Diana Krall, Melody Gardot, Norah Jones, Renée Fleming and Ruth Cameron (Haden's wife, who co-produces).

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Album: Wyatt, Atzmon, Stephen, For The Ghosts Within (Domino)

This collaboration with Tango Siempre violinist Ros Stephen and saxophonist Gilad Atzmon finds Robert Wyatt in relaxed, croonsome mood on a mixture of noirish standards and items from the Wyatt repertoire, the tone of which recalls that ancient TV commercial for Strand cigarettes reworked for the Middle East market.

Album: Soweto Kinch, The New Emancipation (Kinch Recordings)

Saxophonist Kinch is an engaging performer with an enviable social and intellectual reach (Ellington, Madlib and Delius are his touchstones here, along with worksongs and early blues), but this third album once again falls into the "promising" category rather than delivering a truly convincing musical message.