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Evidence of forme  detective who ‘exposed’ corrupt network in Met Police called into question

Police criticised over Triad 'perks': Correction

Detective Inspector David Cater and Detective Inspector Andrew Rennison: an apology

TELEVISION / Snacks for thought: Thomas Sutcliffe gets under the skin of Small Objects of Desire and on the case of Taggart

The skill of the programme-maker lies as much in the resistance of temptation as in wild flights of creativity. Given the task of making a programme about syringes, for example, it is your duty to fight down the urge to include film clips in which well-spoken nurses say, 'I'm just going to give you a little prick'; when it comes to the soundtrack you should struggle against the impulse to use Frank Sinatra singing 'I've got you under my skin'. The fact that both these things turned up inside 10 seconds on last night's Small Objects of Desire (BBC 2) suggested we should not expect too much in the way of self-denial from its makers.

Cancer doctors covered up for colleague: Review of 2,000 cases ordered by health authority after report highlights pathologist's catalogue of errors

DOCTORS failed for eight years to report a colleague's string of diagnostic errors that left 2,000 patients wondering whether they have cancer.

Andreotti 'met boss of bosses': Supergrass provides more allegations of former Italian prime minister's connections with Mafia leaders

A MAFIA pentito - supergrass - saw Salvatore Riina, allegedly the Mafia's boss of all bosses, meet Giulio Andreotti, the former prime minister, and kiss him in greeting, according to testimony published by the Senate immunity commission yesterday.

Andreotti fights back: Supergrass links Italy's veteran statesman to Mafia killings

CHILLING new allegations were made against the former prime minister Giulio Andreotti yesterday as he fought to retain his parliamentary immunity from prosecution for associating with the Mafia.

Triad 'supergrass' is jailed for five years

A TRIAD hit-man who shot a rival was jailed for five years after a court was told he became Britain's first Chinese supergrass and provided 'a unique insight' into a Chinese crime syndicate operating in this country.

Mafia loses its political protection

THE REJOICING in Italy at the arrest of Salvatore Riina, head of the Italian Mafia, is not merely due to the fact that one of the century's most terrifying criminals has been brought to justice.

Supergrass who seemed more misfit than hitman

EVIDENCE from George Wai Hen Cheung, a Triad supergrass, would 'lift the veil of secrecy' and provide a 'unique picture' of the sinister, shadowy world of Triads, an Old Bailey court was told.

Five cleared of Triad plot to kill businessman: David Connett reports on the first British court case in which a member of a Chinese criminal society gave evidence

FIVE men accused of plotting to shoot a Hong Kong businessman during an alleged Triad power struggle were cleared at the Old Bailey yesterday. A sixth man may face a retrial after the jury, unable to reach a verdict, was discharged.

Supergrass claim links Andreotti to Mafia: An inquiry into the death of a leading Italian politician has revealed collusion between the Christian Democrats and Cosa Nostra

THE VEIL is being lifted on possibly the most shameful of all the political ill-doings being uncovered in Italy: the collusion between the Christian Democrat party and Sicily's Cosa Nostra. And the name of Giulio Andreotti, many times prime minister, has emerged.

Loyalist ends hunger strike

Leonard Campbell, 44, a loyalist 'supergrass' on hunger strike in Maghaberry jail, Ulster, has called off his fast after being told he would die by the end of the week. The armed robber claims the authorities had pledged to release him.

Death of republican may be linked to feud

Jimmy Brown, a prominent member of a republican splinter group, the Irish People's Liberation Organisation, was shot dead in west Belfast yesterday. Brown, in his mid-thirties, was hit in the head by shots fired from close range and, in an organisation noted for its feuding, republicans are the prime suspects. As David McKittrick reports, the IPLO has had a brief but violent history

Appeal success

Two men had armed robbery convictions quashed after the Court of Appeal heard that the main evidence against them came from a supergrass who had been discredited because of his involvement in the plot to implicate the Manchester police officer, Ged Corley. Michael Royle, 29, and Robert Hall, 37, both from the Manchester area, had been implicated by George Allan. In 1989, Mr Corley was jailed for 17 years for robbery but cleared by the Court of Appeal in 1990.
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones