Arts and Entertainment Brace yourself: Bob Mortimer and Vic Reeves in 'House of Fools'

Vic and Bob have done sketch shows (The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer), web series (Vic & Bob’s Afternoon Delights), comedy dramas (Catterick, Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased)) and the greatest quiz show of all time (Shooting Stars), but until now they’ve never done a sitcom as sit-commy as this. Their new show, House of Fools (BBC2), is filmed in front of a live studio audience, and the duo play Odd Couple-style flatmates in a home filled with bizarre bric-à-brac and beset by unwelcome visitors.

Biopic to tell the outrageous story of Peggy Guggenheim

A film featuring racy sex scenes, the sinking of the Titanic and portrayals of Marcel Duchamp, Jackson Pollock and James Joyce might be dismissed as too far-fetched by Hollywood standards.

Dylan Jones: ' As a teenager, I adored Dali and thought the moustachioed Surrealist dude was the coolest painter of all'

I thought I was all done with Dali. As a young teenager, I adored him, and, like many impressionable boys of my age, thought the moustachioed Surrealist dude was the coolest painter of them all. You could keep your Picassos, your Matisses and your Rembrandts; it was Dali all the way with me, baby.

Surreal Friends, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Feel at home with the last Surrealist

The Existential Detective, By Alice Thompson

An uncanny mix of art and science

Vampires, vomit, and surrealist video: Oddsac is an album to watch

Ablue muscle-man harvests eggs from a waterfall; a family projectile-vomits goo into a bonfire; a vampire disintegrates. Animal Collective's film Oddsac doesn't sound like your average music video or rockumentary. But then it was never intended to be. The experimental psych-rock band – collaborating with artist Danny Perez – call it a "visual album", where imagery and music are inextricably linked (sometimes the band composed the score in response to Perez's visuals, sometimes he wove them around the music they produced).

Rediscovering Rupert Lee: WWI artist in retrospective

The artist, printmaker and sculptor Rupert Lee was a contemporary of Paul Nash, Stanley Spencer and Nevinson, an associate of the Bloomsbury group and a key figure in the Surrealist movement. For the first time in ninety-years, his work is due to be exhibited at a London gallery.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte, Balthus: A Look into the Invisible, Palazzo Strozzi, Florence

Giorgio de Chirico is one of the painters we know so well from all the reproductions we used to display on our walls when we were breathless students: those lonely, wind-swept piazzas, headless statues and tiny humanoids with their weirdly over-stretched shadows... In fact, as with so many other painters, his work often looks better in reproduction. The crudity of application is smoothed away. All we are left with is the strangely disturbing idea of the work itself, and – in the very best of his art – the bald, bold use of contrasting primary colours. Look at the poster created for this exhibition for example, or the laminated cover of the press pack. They are more arresting than the painting called The Enigma of the Arrival and the Afternoon that it used as its starting point.

Paul Nash: Haunted by the past

Paul Nash depicted both the horror of war and the beauty of the English landscape. Tom Lubbock is left entranced

Great Works: The Living Mirror, René Magritte (1928)

Private collection

Memories of the Future, By Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky

For anyone enthralled by the satirical avant-garde that briefly shone on the fringes of Soviet culture in the 1920s, here's a revelation. Krzhizhanovsky somehow scraped a living in post-revolution Moscow as he wrote stories infused by a disturbing surrealism.

Album: Haflidi Hallgrimsson, Mini Stories (Signum Classics)

'Mini Stories' features plummy recitations by Simon Callow of the Russian surrealist Daniil Kharms' Kafkaesque tales from the 1930s, interspersed with the Icelandic composer Haflidi Hallgrimsson's modernist musical interludes. Dissonances reflect the grim absurdism of the stories, which have the bearing of aphoristic commentaries on the Stalin era.

Sarane Alexandrian: French art historian, poet and right-hand man to André Breton

Sarane Alexandrian was a French art historian and poet, author of more than 50 books, the majority of which focused on the Surrealist movement. He was widely recognised as the right-hand man at the side of André Breton, the father of surrealism, for a brief period during the late 1940s.

Angels of Anarchy: Women Artists and Surrealism, Art Gallery, Manchester

Skewing it for themselves

Magritte painting stolen at gunpoint

The Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte once said: "We must not fear daylight just because it almost always illuminates a miserable world." Two armed thieves put the artist's words into practice yesterday. They walked in broad daylight into a small museum in Brussels, put a gun to the head of a female employee and stole a nude painting of the artist's wife, valued at up to €3m (£2.7m).

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