Arts and Entertainment Brace yourself: Bob Mortimer and Vic Reeves in 'House of Fools'

Vic and Bob have done sketch shows (The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer), web series (Vic & Bob’s Afternoon Delights), comedy dramas (Catterick, Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased)) and the greatest quiz show of all time (Shooting Stars), but until now they’ve never done a sitcom as sit-commy as this. Their new show, House of Fools (BBC2), is filmed in front of a live studio audience, and the duo play Odd Couple-style flatmates in a home filled with bizarre bric-à-brac and beset by unwelcome visitors.

Rhiannon Harries: What to have? Why not start with service with a smile...

One area of my finances which I can't say has taken too severe a hit in the recession (unless, of course, you happen to be the person with whom I discuss the state of my bank account at NatWest) is my "entertainment" budget. By which, I'm afraid I mean what I spend on the ephemeral pleasures of eating and drinking out, rather than anything with a lasting intellectual or spiritual legacy, such as the theatre or a good book.

Doctor Cecil Helman: Medical anthropologist, GP and writer who found fame with his book 'Suburban Shaman'

In the summer of 1973, I made a pilgrimage to the Jerusalem home of the great Israeli poet, Yehuda Amichai. Later that same year Cecil Helman. It is possible that Amichai liked neither of us and decided we deserved one another, though we preferred to think the opposite. Either way, he gave Cecil my telephone number, thereby creating a constant friendship that was broken only by Cecil's death at the age of 65.

Picasso sketchbook is stolen

A notebook full of Pablo Picasso's sketches worth several million pounds has been stolen from the Paris museum that bears the painter's name.

Theatre of the absurd is a belated tribute to Magritte

Belgium is honouring its resident surrealist with a permanent display of his works. Just don't call it a museum, says Claire Soares

In Brussels, you can't walk away from René

New museum honours Magritte

Claude Berri: Film director and screenwriterbest known for 'Jean de Florette' and 'Manon des Sources'

Claude Berri was a throwback: a film-maker who specialised in old-fashioned epics. He may have been a contemporary of French New Wave directors like Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut (who was his close friend), but his was not a cinema of shock tactics, polemics, or jump cuts. Especiallylater in his career, Berri tended to work on a very big canvas, albeit telling intimate stories. His movies were often period pieces heavily influenced by literature and painting. He was not railing against "le cinéma de papa" ("Dad's cinema" – Truffaut's term of disparagement for the old-fashioned style of film-making) and, as if to underline this point, he even made an autobiographical film in 1970 called Le Cinéma De Papa.

Henri Cartier-Bresson, By Clément Chéroux

Though the reputation of the great French lensman is currently in post-mortem decline, as the stock of downbeat photographers such as Stephen Shore and William Eggleston continues to soar, this little book reminds of the prodigious talent that produced many of the most famous images of the 20th century. Born in 1908 to an artistic family that made its money through thread-making (we even get to see some "Cartier-Bresson" reels on page 14), the young Henri arrived in Paris just in time for the flowering of surrealism. A little-known self-portrait of his legs lying on the edge of a precipice deserves to be one of the most celebrated works in this genre.

Google redesign logo to celebrate artist's life

Google have temporarily redesigned their logo to incorporate elements of work by the artist Rene Magritte.

Album: Phil Manzanera, Firebird VII (Expression)

On Firebird VII, the Roxy Music guitarist returns with drummer Charles Hayward to the territory they staked out as jazz-rock outfit Quiet Sun in the mid-Seventies, here accompanied by bassist Yaron Stavi and pianist Leszek Mozdzer.

Fantasy scene: Luis Bunuel's 'Belle de Jour'

A woman's masochistic fantasies, created by men

Free award-winning DVD with the print edition

This Sunday The Independent is giving away Luis Buñuel’s classic film Exterminating Angel.

Album: Adam Green, Sixes & Sevens (Rough Trade)

With The Moldy Peaches' music featuring in the film Juno, Adam Green's stock has never been higher – which may account for his easygoing tone on this fifth solo album.

Duchamp, Man Ray, Picabia, Tate Modern, London

Duchamp eclipses his fellow Dadaists – and yet, when all's said and done, this show revolves around a urinal
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent