Arts and Entertainment Brace yourself: Bob Mortimer and Vic Reeves in 'House of Fools'

Vic and Bob have done sketch shows (The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer), web series (Vic & Bob’s Afternoon Delights), comedy dramas (Catterick, Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased)) and the greatest quiz show of all time (Shooting Stars), but until now they’ve never done a sitcom as sit-commy as this. Their new show, House of Fools (BBC2), is filmed in front of a live studio audience, and the duo play Odd Couple-style flatmates in a home filled with bizarre bric-à-brac and beset by unwelcome visitors.

Neighbours won't let sleeping Buddahs lie

Neighbours of comedian Vic Reeves have complained to their local council because the star of BBC2's Shooting Stars put squatting Buddahs on the gateposts of his home and erected a six-foot fence around his property.

Monday's Book - Don't Tell Sybil: an intimate memoir of ELT Mesens

By George Melly (Heinemann, pounds l7.99)

VISUAL ARTS Surrealism and After Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

As a nation we have always been keen on Surrealism. We like a bit of oddity with our art: not just Dali's melting watches and Magritte's visual puns, but the tougher, more intellectual side of things too. It's no accident that three of the world's greatest collections of Surrealist and Dada art have been assembled in Britain, by Edward James, Roland Penrose and, most recently, by champion golfer turned art collector, Gabrielle Keiller. Hers has just gone on show at the SNGMA in Edinburgh, already home to the Penrose library and archive, and now, thanks to the Keiller bequest, a world-class centre for this sort of art.

Letter: Rise of the cult of Rimbaud

Sir: You are in my view to be highly commended for publishing the recent article by Roger Clarke on Rimbaud, as Rimbaud's enormous influence in modern culture is generally under-rated in Britain. For this reason I do not wish to appear churlish, but I feel bound to express dissent from two ideas suggested in the article.

Art: not even as good as God

DUCHAMP by Calvin Tomkins Chatto pounds 25

Obituary: Eugene Guillevic

One of France's most distinguished contemporary poets hated his mother. "I had a really wicked mother," Eugene Guillevic said. Surely no poet could hope for a better introduction to chastened poetic style, without an ounce of sentimentalism.

Deflation hits Kent

Kent 154 and 117 Gloucestershire 241 and 33-0 Gloucestershire won by 10 wkts

TICKET OFFER: SADLER'S WELLS

Up until the 9 September a fascinating season of new work is on show at the Lilian Baylis Theatre, Sadler's Wells, London EC1. With more than 50 companies taking part, Mosaics 95 presents a different programme every night, providing a showcase for the country's up-and-coming talent. On Wednesday 9 August Jumpstart presents Ceci n'est pas une Danse, a dance theatre piece inspired by the work of the surrealist painter Rene Magritte (above).

UNDERRATED; The case for Picasso's prints

Picasso, we all know, was the artist of the century. A dynamic, enigmatic giant of a painter of unquestionable originality and influence. Last year his sculptural work also underwent convincing reappraisal at the Tate Gallery. But what has been said of his skill as a print-maker? Certainly the Vollard suite of the 1930s - with its classical arcadias and unambiguous minotaurs - has been praised as a major achievement. What, though, of his two late series of prints? Suite 347 and Suite 156, respectively dated 1968 and 1970, have traditionally been the poor relation of Picasso's oeuvre. Yet, looking at them reproduced (in Picasso: Inside the Image, recently published by Thames & Hudson, £16.95), one feels that herein may lie the elusive essence of the master's art.

VISUAL ARTS : Ugliness is in the eye of the beholder

It's kooky, it's spooky and it inspired surrealism. Iain Gale on `The Grotesque' at the Whitworth Gallery, Manchester

One giant leap for a Man

It's a great name, Man Ray. Vaguely mysterious, vaguely exotic. Ray has overtones of science fiction, and giant rays floating in the Pacific, and giant rays flashing through space and Sugar Ray Robinson.

RIGHT OF REPLY: The accidental alchemist

`Lousy photographs and terrible paintings' we said. Not so, says Val Wi lliams: Man Ray was a dreamer and a genius A little man from Brooklyn, he gazed with amazement at a European bohemia of va nity and glamour

Whoops! There goes a double negative

Man Ray is remembered as a photographer, but craved recognition as a pa inter. Andrew Palmer and Mel Gooding have bad news

Metro Choice: Obscure objects of desire

His early films caused riots on the streets of Paris in the Thirties. His penultimate work earned him the Best Foreign Film Oscar 40 years later. Somewhere in between, Luis Bunuel's reputation as a master surrealist film-maker was cemented, intert wined though it was with legendary tales of scandal and censorship. They were all true, of course - how the FBI opened a file on him, and how Spain, his home country, took the extreme measure of banning all his work when it was scandalised by Viridiana ( 1961,above). This film is just one of 10 movies resurrected this week at the Barbican in a season that will also showcase lesser-seen works like the oppressive, slyly funny The Exterminating Angel, and the spaced-out short Simon of the Desert. Everyone remembers the anecdotes - his foot fetishism, his on-off friendship with Salvador Dali, his bizarre, alienating work processes. "The imagination is a muscle," Bunuel said. "It needs to be exercised." Prepare to make your grey matter sweat.
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