Arts and Entertainment Brace yourself: Bob Mortimer and Vic Reeves in 'House of Fools'

Vic and Bob have done sketch shows (The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer), web series (Vic & Bob’s Afternoon Delights), comedy dramas (Catterick, Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased)) and the greatest quiz show of all time (Shooting Stars), but until now they’ve never done a sitcom as sit-commy as this. Their new show, House of Fools (BBC2), is filmed in front of a live studio audience, and the duo play Odd Couple-style flatmates in a home filled with bizarre bric-à-brac and beset by unwelcome visitors.

Neighbours won't let sleeping Buddahs lie

Neighbours of comedian Vic Reeves have complained to their local council because the star of BBC2's Shooting Stars put squatting Buddahs on the gateposts of his home and erected a six-foot fence around his property.

Monday's Book - Don't Tell Sybil: an intimate memoir of ELT Mesens

By George Melly (Heinemann, pounds l7.99)

VISUAL ARTS Surrealism and After Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

As a nation we have always been keen on Surrealism. We like a bit of oddity with our art: not just Dali's melting watches and Magritte's visual puns, but the tougher, more intellectual side of things too. It's no accident that three of the world's greatest collections of Surrealist and Dada art have been assembled in Britain, by Edward James, Roland Penrose and, most recently, by champion golfer turned art collector, Gabrielle Keiller. Hers has just gone on show at the SNGMA in Edinburgh, already home to the Penrose library and archive, and now, thanks to the Keiller bequest, a world-class centre for this sort of art.

Letter: Rise of the cult of Rimbaud

Sir: You are in my view to be highly commended for publishing the recent article by Roger Clarke on Rimbaud, as Rimbaud's enormous influence in modern culture is generally under-rated in Britain. For this reason I do not wish to appear churlish, but I feel bound to express dissent from two ideas suggested in the article.

Art: not even as good as God

DUCHAMP by Calvin Tomkins Chatto pounds 25

Obituary: Eugene Guillevic

One of France's most distinguished contemporary poets hated his mother. "I had a really wicked mother," Eugene Guillevic said. Surely no poet could hope for a better introduction to chastened poetic style, without an ounce of sentimentalism.

Deflation hits Kent

Kent 154 and 117 Gloucestershire 241 and 33-0 Gloucestershire won by 10 wkts

TICKET OFFER: SADLER'S WELLS

Up until the 9 September a fascinating season of new work is on show at the Lilian Baylis Theatre, Sadler's Wells, London EC1. With more than 50 companies taking part, Mosaics 95 presents a different programme every night, providing a showcase for the country's up-and-coming talent. On Wednesday 9 August Jumpstart presents Ceci n'est pas une Danse, a dance theatre piece inspired by the work of the surrealist painter Rene Magritte (above).

UNDERRATED; The case for Picasso's prints

Picasso, we all know, was the artist of the century. A dynamic, enigmatic giant of a painter of unquestionable originality and influence. Last year his sculptural work also underwent convincing reappraisal at the Tate Gallery. But what has been said of his skill as a print-maker? Certainly the Vollard suite of the 1930s - with its classical arcadias and unambiguous minotaurs - has been praised as a major achievement. What, though, of his two late series of prints? Suite 347 and Suite 156, respectively dated 1968 and 1970, have traditionally been the poor relation of Picasso's oeuvre. Yet, looking at them reproduced (in Picasso: Inside the Image, recently published by Thames & Hudson, £16.95), one feels that herein may lie the elusive essence of the master's art.

VISUAL ARTS : Ugliness is in the eye of the beholder

It's kooky, it's spooky and it inspired surrealism. Iain Gale on `The Grotesque' at the Whitworth Gallery, Manchester

One giant leap for a Man

It's a great name, Man Ray. Vaguely mysterious, vaguely exotic. Ray has overtones of science fiction, and giant rays floating in the Pacific, and giant rays flashing through space and Sugar Ray Robinson.

RIGHT OF REPLY: The accidental alchemist

`Lousy photographs and terrible paintings' we said. Not so, says Val Wi lliams: Man Ray was a dreamer and a genius A little man from Brooklyn, he gazed with amazement at a European bohemia of va nity and glamour

Whoops! There goes a double negative

Man Ray is remembered as a photographer, but craved recognition as a pa inter. Andrew Palmer and Mel Gooding have bad news

Metro Choice: Obscure objects of desire

His early films caused riots on the streets of Paris in the Thirties. His penultimate work earned him the Best Foreign Film Oscar 40 years later. Somewhere in between, Luis Bunuel's reputation as a master surrealist film-maker was cemented, intert wined though it was with legendary tales of scandal and censorship. They were all true, of course - how the FBI opened a file on him, and how Spain, his home country, took the extreme measure of banning all his work when it was scandalised by Viridiana ( 1961,above). This film is just one of 10 movies resurrected this week at the Barbican in a season that will also showcase lesser-seen works like the oppressive, slyly funny The Exterminating Angel, and the spaced-out short Simon of the Desert. Everyone remembers the anecdotes - his foot fetishism, his on-off friendship with Salvador Dali, his bizarre, alienating work processes. "The imagination is a muscle," Bunuel said. "It needs to be exercised." Prepare to make your grey matter sweat.
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<p>Jonathan Ross</p>
<p>Jonathan Ross (or Wossy, as he’s affectionately known) has been on television and radio for an extraordinarily long time, working on a seat in the pantheon of British presenters. Hosting Friday Night with Jonathan Ross for nine years, Ross has been in everything from the video game Fable to Phineas and Ferb. So it’s probably not so surprising that Ross studied at Southampton College of Art (since rebranded Southampton Solent), a university known nowadays for its media production courses.</p>
<p>However, after leaving Solent, Ross studied History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, now part of the UCL, a move that was somewhat out of keeping with the rest of his career. Ross was made a fellow of the school in 2006 in recognition of his services to broadcasting.</p>
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Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album
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How We Met: Hugh Bonneville & Peter James

'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'
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Bill Granger's heavenly crab recipes

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Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

After a remarkable conversion from reckless defender to prolific striker, Monaco's ace says he wants to make his loan deal at Old Trafford permanent
Terry Venables: Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England

Terry Venables column

Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England
The Inside Word: Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past

Michael Calvin's Inside Word

Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past