Cinderella movie: Lily James speaks out against 'upsetting and boring' criticism of her waist

'Why do women always get pointed at for their bodies?' the actress asked

Lily James as Ella in Disney's live action remake of Cinderella
Lily James as Ella in Disney's live action remake of Cinderella

Lily James has dismissed criticism of her miniature waist in the upcoming Cinderella film as “upsetting and boring”.

Publicity shots for the Disney film, which is being released UK cinemas next month, were first criticised for allegedly being photoshopped, which director Kenneth Branagh denied, and then for being an “unhealthy” role model for young girls.

“On one hand it's upsetting, on the other hand it's just boring,” James said in an interview with HuffPost Live.

“Why do women always get pointed at for their bodies? And why is this whole thing happening and I'm constantly having to justify myself?

“International Women's Day has just gone, and it just feels just a bit sad that it's still happening. You know, I'm very healthy and I always have been.”

James said the “hard to wear” corset and blue dress contributed to the effect, with the full skirts exaggerating her shape.

Calling the storm of criticism “confusing”, she said people should realise that costumes changes people’s appearance.

Richard Madden, who plays Prince Charming, supported his co-star by saying that he knew her waist was real because he held it, adding “she eats like a boy”.

Branagh, the director of Cinderella, denied photoshopping rumours that circulated after the trailer was released last month, showing the famous ball scene.

Access unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows with Amazon Prime Video Sign up now for a 30-day free trial

Sign up
Sir Kenneth Branagh said James' waist was 'absolutely not' digitally altered

“It was not (digitally altered), it was not,” Branagh responded. “I can't remember anybody during that ball sequence who went up next to her and didn't go, 'Oh my god!' Then they'd look round the other side.

“I was constantly saying, 'You are eating, aren't you Lily? Let's get Lily some soup please! These gowns were beautifully crafted and they produced shapes that were very extreme. To all the airbrush conspiracy theorists I can answer now: no.”

Elizabeth McGovern as Cora, Countess of Grantham and Lily James as Lady Rosein the Downton Abbey Christmas special 2013

James is best known for playing Lady Rose MacClare in Downton Abbey, and stars in Cinderella alongside Helena Bonham-Carter and Cate Blanchett.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in