Sienna Miller says she called Harvey Weinstein ‘Pops’

Actor also called out ‘liberal fascism’ in dictating that only certain actors can play minority ethnic and gay roles

Ellie Harrison
Saturday 05 October 2019 11:42
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Sienna Miller has revealed she used to call Harvey Weinstein “Pops” and said “on some level” she did this to deflect her suspicions about him.

The actor, who worked with the disgraced movie mogul on numerous films including Factory Girl, also said Weinstein never “propositioned me for work with sex”.

“It’s really complicated to talk about this carefully,” she told The Telegraph. “I called Harvey ‘Pops’ from day one.

"Probably because on some level I sensed that that [other side of him] existed and it was a way of deflecting whatever I felt. And it did, and that was lucky. I’d go, ‘Oi Pops, give us a job’, and he’d go, ‘Ah, stappit.’

Speaking about the sexual assault allegations made against Weinstein, which he has consistently denied, she said: “I had never had that kind of experience, thank God. I mean, I was yelled at, but that was just Harvey, you know, you’d just brush it off… He did scream at men as well."

She added: “But I was very fortunate that no one ever propositioned me for work with sex – and if they had, I would probably have slapped them. But it’s not that easy.

“I know that you couldn’t say no to Harvey if he asked you to do something. For me, it would be, like, an extra week of press, so I imagine in a situation where it’s sexual, it would also be hard to say no, and that’s crushing.”

Miller recently claimed Weinstein reduced her to tears in her early career after he told her to refrain from “partying”.

In the new interview, she also weighed in on the debate about which roles actors should be able to play in terms of minority ethnic, gay and transgender characters.

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“I feel everybody should be able to play everybody,” she said. “It seems absurd to me to start to legislate on creativity. That’s not trying to be insensitive – of course, there are people who have a deeper understanding of experiences, and they should definitely be considered… [but] I certainly don’t want to play myself for the rest of my life.”

She added: “I think it’s English to not be as careful. It feels like liberal is becoming almost fascistic in its controlling of what can and cannot be done. It feels dangerous to me.”

Miller can next be seen playing the mother of a missing girl in American Woman, which is released in cinemas from Friday.

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