Golden Globes 2014: Breaking Bad wins two awards with first for Bryan Cranston

The actor said it was a 'lovely way to say goodbye to the show'

Daisy Wyatt
Monday 13 January 2014 03:19
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Bryan Cranston won est actor in a drama series
Bryan Cranston won est actor in a drama series

Breaking Bad was honoured with its first two Golden Globes at the ceremony in Los Angeles last night.

The hit AMC drama, which follows the murky world of meth kingpin Walter White, won for Best Television Drama and Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series.

Picking up his first Golden Globe, actor Bryan Cranston, who had been nominated for the accolade three times before, said: “This is such a wonderful honour and such a lovely way to say goodbye to the show that has meant so much to me.”

He joked that the award would allow more people around the world to “be able to share in Breaking Bad’s mirth and merriment”.

Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan said the award gave him “one more chance to thank the fans of the show”, after the drama ended its five series run in September last year.

Actor Aaron Paul, who plays White’s cooking aide Jesse Pinkman, was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in a TV Series, but lost out to veteran actor Jon Voight for his role in Ray Donovan.

It was a successful night for Netflix, which aside from having a role to play in Breaking Bad’s worldwide popularity, also received four nominations for its original series House of Cards.

Robin Wright picked up the drama’s only win for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series (Drama).

HBO’s Behind the Candelabra also picked up two awards in the television category, winning for Best Motion Picture and Best Actor in a Motion Picture, which Michael Douglas won over co-star Matt Damon.

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British actress Jacqueline Bisset won Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture, for her portrayal of Lady Cremone’s in Stephen Poliakoff's BBC drama Dancing on the Edge.

In an eccentric acceptance speech punctuated by silence, she continued to talk when the music tried to usher her offstage and then forced the censor to press the “bleep” button after she uttered a profanity.

“I want to thank my mother,” she said. “What did she say? Go to hell and don't come back.”

Read more:

Jennifer Lawrence wins supporting actress accolade
Jacqueline Bisset first Brit to win

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