Stranger Things 3: Cary Elwes and Jake Busey join cast

The Princess Bride actor will play Hawkins 'handsome, slick, and sleazy' Mayor

Jack Shepherd
Wednesday 18 April 2018 14:33
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Information regarding season three of Stranger Things has remained fairly thin, despite the second chapter having finished months ago.

Finally, though, we have something substantial to report: two prolific actors have joined the cast, Cary Elwes and Jake Busey.

The casting of Elwes seems very fitting considering the series’ adoration for 80s and the actor having appeared in one of the decade’s classic comedies: The Princess Bride. Elwes went on to appear in Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Saw, and TV series The Art of More.

The 55-year-old will play the “handsome, slick, and sleazy” Mayor of Hawkins Indiana, described further as a “classic '80s politician”. The official description describes Mayor Kline as being “more concerned with his own image than with the people of the small town he governs.”

Busey has also starred in numerous films and TV series, playing Ace Levy in Starship Troopers, as well as key roles in the From Dusk Till Dawn TV series, Ray Donavan, and Agents of SHIELD. The actor will play Bruce on Stranger Things, a journalist for The Hawkins Post who has “questionable morals and a sick sense of humour”.

Shawn Levy, one of the show’s producers, previously gave away some plot details about the series, saying: “Mike and Eleven and are going strong, so that's a relationship that continues, and same with Mad Max and Lucas.

“But Again, they're like 13 or 14-year-old kids, so what does romance mean at that stage of life? It can never be simple and stable relationships and there's fun to that instability.”

Levy also promised “more of Steve Harrington in season three, and I'll just say we won't be abandoning the Dad Steve magic.”

Meanwhile, the creators of the series – The Duffer Brothers – were recently accused of plagiarising the plot, something they have denied doing.

Stranger Things 3 will likely reach Netflix next year.

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