Heartbreaking video shows peacock refusing to leave its ‘long-time partner’ even after its death

The birds had been living together for four years on the property of a senior wildlife officer

Maroosha Muzaffar
Friday 07 January 2022 03:13
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Peacock refuses to leave 'longtime partner' even after its death

A heart breaking video of a peacock following two men who are carrying the dead body of his “long-time partner” on a piece of cloth has left Indian social media users tearful.

The 19-second clip was tweeted by Parveen Kaswan, an Indian Forest Services (IFS) officer on Wednesday after which it collected more than 200,000 views.

The incident took place in the Thala Dhani area in the Nagaur district of India’s northwestern Rajasthan state.

The eight-year-old peacock had died due to poor eyesight and old age, according to a report on Sunday in the vernacular newspaper Dainik Bhaskar newspaper.

The dead peacock’s companion was seen roaming around the body for almost three hours.

Mr Kaswan, citing the Dainik Bhaskar report, said the birds were together for four years.

When two men arrived to take the peacock carcass away for disposal, its “long-time partner” kept following the men.

“The peacock doesn’t want to leave the long-time partner after his death. Touching video,” he said in the tweet.

The birds had been living together for four years on the property of a senior wildlife officer, according to Mr Kaswan.

“After [the] death of one, another participated in [the] funeral,” he wrote in another tweet.

Mr Bishnoi was quoted as saying by Dainik Bhaskar that the birds were like members of his family.

On social media, several thousand users were moved by the love and friendship between the birds.

“Animals have more love and affection for each other than humans. Touching indeed,” wrote one user.

“The most beautiful thing I saw on [the] web today,” wrote another user.

“It’s really heart-wrenching,” said another.

Mr Kaswan routinely posts videos of wildlife on his Twitter account.

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