Aston Martin CEO Tobias Moers departs after Lawrence Stroll rift

‘Strategic differences’ between Moers and Stroll have led to the exit with former Ferrari CEO Amedeo Felisa coming in as a replacement

Luke Baker
Wednesday 04 May 2022 10:04
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<p>Tobias Moers has left his role as CEO at the British carmaker  </p>

Tobias Moers has left his role as CEO at the British carmaker

Aston Martin have parted ways with CEO Tobias Moers after what are reported to be “strategic differences” with part-owner of the F1 team, Lawrence Stroll.

Stroll - father of Aston Martin drive Lance - has invested heavily in the company, linking it up with his F1 team, and according to Carbuzz.com, the “strategic differences” between he and Moers first being reported back in January.

The report added that “details on the specifics of Moers’ departure and Stroll’s role in it are unclear, and we expect them to stay that way. Aston doesn’t want to go airing dirty laundry.”

On the F1 track, Aston Martin have suffered a dismal start to the season, with Lance Stroll and Sebastian Vettel picking up just five points between them so far, although four-time world champion Vettel did miss the first two races of the season after testing positive for Covid-19.

Aston Martin confirmed the news of Moers’ departure on Wednesday morning and in statment, Stroll Sr thanked Moers - who became CEO in August 2020 - for his time with the company.

“Firstly, I would like to extend my thanks and appreciation for all that Tobias has achieved,” said the Canadian billionaire.

“He joined Aston Martin at a critical time for the company and brought significant discipline to its operations. The benefit of these actions is clear in the improved operating performance of the company and in our great new product launches.

“There is a need for the business to enter a new phase of growth with a new leadership team and structure to ensure we deliver on our goals. Our new organisational framework will support the company to… foster greater collaboration… especially with our strategic partners, including Mercedes-Benz AG, and further accelerate technology transfer programmes with the Aston Martin Aramco Cognizant Formula One Team.”

Tobias Moers had been Aston Martin CEO since August 2020

Following Moers’ exit, former Ferrari CEO Amedeo Felisa will take up the role of Aston Martin CEO from 1 June 2022.

“Amedeo will focus on delivering the company’s continued strategic objectives, financial targets and roadmap towards electrification,” read an Aston Martin statement.

“To meet these goals, Amedeo is to implement and lead a new organisational structure with a focus on broadening the technical team through the promotion of internal talent together with added expertise of strategic external hires, identified and set to be announced in the coming weeks.”

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