FIA outlines Abu Dhabi Grand Prix inquiry process that could decide Lewis Hamilton’s F1 future

It has been reported that Hamilton is awaiting the results of the inquiry before deciding whether to race in the 2022 season

Jamie Braidwood
Thursday 13 January 2022 17:18
Comments
FIA Investigation Key To Hamilton's F1 Future

The results of the FIA’s inquiry into the highly controversial Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, which saw Lewis Hamilton lose out on a record-breaking eighth world title to Max Verstappen last month, will not be announced until the eve of the opening weekend of the 2022 season.

Hamilton was left “disillusioned” by the manner in which the closing stages of the season-deciding race were allowed to unfold and it has been reported in recent days that the 36-year-old is awaiting the results of the inquiry before deciding whether to return to Formula One next season.

The British driver has been silent since losing out on the championship to Verstappen on the final lap of the campaign. Mercedes were left furious by the decisions of race director Michael Masi, who allowed some but not all overtaken cars to unlap themselves under a late safety car, but withdrew their appeals of the result.

They did so on the condition that the FIA would analyse the closing stages of the race, in order to “improve the robustness of the rules, governance and decision-making in Formula One”.

Newly-elected FIA president Mohammed Ben Sulayem has been in touch with Hamilton as the governing body looks to regain the seven-time champion’s trust in the sport, but the results of the inquiry are said to be crucial in whether they are successful.

Those results will not be announced until the opening day of the F1 calendar, however, and on the same day as the first practice session of the season at the Bahrain Grand Prix on Friday 18 March.

“The outcome of the detailed analysis will be presented to the F1 Commission in February and final decisions will be announced at the World Motor Sport Council in Bahrain on 18 March,” the FIA said.

The opening race of the season takes place in Bahrain that weekend, with the first qualifying session being held on Saturday 19 March and the opening race on Sunday 20 March.

In a statement outlining the process of their review, the FIA said the controversial use of the safety car, which followed Nicholas Latifi’s late crash, would be discussed at a meeting of the Sporting Advisory Committee on 19 January. They also said they would be holding discussions with all 20 drivers over the coming weeks.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in