It is frightening just how easily investors were seduced into the cult of WeWork

There is nothing unique about WeWork – all you need is an empty office block to set up your own shared working space – so why did so many investors get involved with Adam Neumann’s cult-like business? Asks Chris Blackhurst

Friday 24 September 2021 21:30
comments
<p>A WeWork office space in the DUMBO neighbourhood of  Brooklyn, New York City</p>

A WeWork office space in the DUMBO neighbourhood of Brooklyn, New York City

Walking into a shared office space in the City last week I could have been forgiven for supposing I was entering a WeWork.

There was the similar decor (complete with slogans inspiring me to lead a better life), the food and drinks counter, full meeting rooms, casually dressed folks wearing headphones sitting hunched over laptops. It looked, felt, smelt like a WeWork. Except it wasn’t. It was a recently divided-up building, of which there are now thousands in in cities and towns everywhere.

I had the dubious pleasure of meeting Adam Neumann, the WeWork founder, when he opened in London. Dubious because Neumann spoke and I listened.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

View comments