What could state education learn from alternative schools?

Rigid curriculums are rejected in favour of a system where children choose what they want to learn. But should all institutions play copycat, Len Williams asks

<p>Experts say the democratic teaching method prepares students better for life after education </p>

Experts say the democratic teaching method prepares students better for life after education

During the great coronavirus home education experiment, parents around the world got a novel insight into what really goes on in their children’s schools. And while there’s plenty in the system to be praised, many were shocked to find out how their kids are being taught and what they’re learning. Some are even questioning if the current system really delivers what their children need.

The last year has been a rocky one for the British education sector. From the GCSE and A-level grading scandal to the catch-up funding debacle or the sight of university students being locked in their halls of residence, levels of dissatisfaction with the system are high. So, is it now the time to reconsider what we really want from education?

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