Traffickers often see sporting events as an opportunity. That’s why people need to know to spot the signs

We need to educate people on how to recognise the signs of exploitation and what to do when they see them, writes Sarah de Carvalho

Sunday 25 July 2021 13:35
<p>Survivor stories reveal that traffickers use the increased tourism around big events as opportunities to make money</p>

Survivor stories reveal that traffickers use the increased tourism around big events as opportunities to make money

Human trafficking is defined as the exploitation of people through forced labour or sexual exploitation by means of force, fraud or coercion. It is a form of modern-day slavery. The International Labour Organisation estimates that more than 24 million people worldwide are trapped in human trafficking and exploitation.

Public awareness of these crimes has grown immensely, since It’s a Penalty first launched in 2014. Yet, there are still many that think trafficking happens far away, in other countries to other people.

Human trafficking does not discriminate. It takes place in every community around the world in some form, and no country is exempt. Victims of these crimes can be any gender, age, ethnicity or sexuality, but children and marginalised groups are particularly vulnerable.