The battle against the drop in universal credit seemed lost – but it is not over yet

The temporary increase in universal credit has already come to an end, but the fight to restore it goes on, writes John Rentoul

Friday 22 October 2021 14:08
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<p>Baroness Stroud, the Tory peer, is leading the rebellion against the cut in universal credit in the Lords</p>

Baroness Stroud, the Tory peer, is leading the rebellion against the cut in universal credit in the Lords

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Lower universal credit payments have already started to appear in people’s bank accounts, but the parliamentary fight against the end of the £20-a-week uplift goes on. It is still possible that rebel Conservative peers might force Boris Johnson to put the question to a vote in the House of Commons – something he managed to avoid until now.

Philippa Stroud, a Tory peer who was adviser to Iain Duncan Smith, the creator of universal credit, is expected to table amendments in the House of Lords today, and Nikki da Costa, who was director of legislative affairs at No 10 when Theresa May was prime minister, has explained how this could force the government to think again.

Labour MPs in the Commons voted against the cut in universal credit last month, but the motion wasn’t binding, and the Conservatives abstained, so we never got to find out how many Conservative MPs would have rebelled on the issue.

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