Remains of fabled 17th century shipwreck found on Oregon coast

Marine archaeologists say recovery of timber after 300 years is ‘crazy’

<p>An Oregon beach near the cave where remains of the Beeswax were recovered this week</p>

An Oregon beach near the cave where remains of the Beeswax were recovered this week

The 300-year-old mystery of the “Beeswax” shipwreck has finally been solved after timber remains of the fabled Spanish vessel were located on Oregon’s northern coast.

Local fisherman and treasure hunter Craig Andes said he first discovered the bits of timber in a cave near Manzanita, north of Astoria, in 2013, which he believed belonged to the Beeswax.

The Manila-style Spanish galleon – known in Spanish as the Santo Cristo de Burgos –  had been sailing from the Philippines to Mexico when it went missing in 1693, becoming the source of local legend for centuries.

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