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<p>Martha Stewart releases replica of nativity set she made in prison</p>

Martha Stewart releases replica of nativity set she made in prison

Martha Stewart releases replica of nativity set she made in prison

She said the ‘street cred’-friendly gift is inspired by her time ‘at camp’

Saman Javed
Tuesday 21 December 2021 14:16
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Martha Stewart is selling replicas of the ceramic nativity set she made while she was in prison.

In a new video posted to her TikTok account, the writer and TV personality said the white figurines, complete with baby Jesus, Mary and Joseph, make for a “really beautiful and special gift” with “a little street cred”.

“Inspired by, guess what, the set that I made when I was confined,” she said.

She also showed viewers the original set, in a darker fawn shade, which still has her inmate number on the bottom.

“These are the exact replicas of the nativity scene that I made in my pottery class when I was away at camp,” she added, comparing both sets.

Stewart, a Catholic, spent five months in a prison in West Virginia between 2004 and 2005 after she was convicted on charges of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and making false statements.

Stewart’s latest business venture is being hailed as “iconic” on TikTok, where the video has been watched more than 300,000 times.

“Martha Stewart capitalising on her prison work is the energy we all never knew we needed this year,” one user wrote.

Another said: “Who goes to jail and makes the world’s best nativity set?”

“Honestly with this backstory, worth every penny,” a third person wrote.

Others noted her choice of vocabulary and avoiding the use of the word “prison”.

“’At camp’. Icon,” one person wrote. Another said: “Only Martha goes to camp and brings back decorations!”

The set, which is being sold here, retails for $149 (£112). It is currently on sale ahead of Christmas for $119.20 (£89).

Stewart spoke about her experience in prison in an interview with Harper’s Bazaar earlier this year.

“I knew I was strong going in and I was certainly stronger coming out,” Stewart said.

“It was a very serious happening in my life. I take it very seriously. I’m not bitter about it. My daughter knows all the problems that resulted because of that. There’s a lot.”

She said her only “big regret” that came from her prison sentence is that she couldn’t host Saturday Night Live.

“My probation officer wouldn’t give me the time. That really pissed me off, because I would have loved to have hosted Saturday Night Live. I’d like that on my résumé.”

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