Missguided unveils diverse mannequins with stretch marks and vitiligo

There are different kinds of beauty

Missguided's new range of mannequins features female figures of different ethnicities and with skin conditions such as vitiligo
Missguided's new range of mannequins features female figures of different ethnicities and with skin conditions such as vitiligo

Fashion brand Missguided has unveiled a diverse range of mannequins being displayed in store in an effort to be more representative of all women.

The new collection of mannequins includes female figures of different ethnicities, in addition to highlighting skin conditions such as stretch marks and vitiligo.

Whereas women are often made to feel less than beautiful if they’re not aesthetically perfect in the eyes of society, Missguided wants these mannequins to show their customers that beauty comes in many forms.

Missguided has unveiled a new diverse range of mannequins being displayed in their two stores

The mannequins are on display in the brand’s two stores at Westfield Stratford City in London and Bluewater Shopping Centre in Kent.

Many people have been praising the fashion brand for the addition of mannequins that promote inclusivity.

“Mannequins that look like women! You are doing amazing sweety [sic],” one person wrote on Twitter.

“The fact that @Missguided make their mannequins realistic makes me love them even more,” another individual commented.

While Missguided’s mannequins are a step in the right direction, some people have made the point that they still only represent one specific body type.

“Great to see Missguided have got mannequins with freckles, stretch marks etc but how about some which aren’t size 0 now,” a Twitter user wrote.

Last May, a study by the University of Liverpool concluded that the average female mannequin represented the body type of a “severely underweight woman.”

Missguided has been praised for its inclusivity, although some people have questioned why the mannequins only represent one body type

“Because ultra-thin ideals encourage the development of body image problems in young people, we need to change the environment to reduce emphasis on the value of extreme thinness,” said Dr Robinson, whose team conducted the study.

In December last year, Missguided launched a body positivity campaign called Make Your Mark.

The campaign featured nine models, emphasising the fact that none of them were airbrushed in the imagery.

The lineup of women included a range of models, body positive activists and bloggers.

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