Out-of-date Irn Bru bottle being sold for £250 on eBay

Expired bottle commemorated Burns Night in 2017

AG Barr, the company behind Irn-Bru – dubbed Scotland’s other national drink – has confirmed talks over a possible £1.4bn merger with Britvic, maker of Tango
AG Barr, the company behind Irn-Bru – dubbed Scotland’s other national drink – has confirmed talks over a possible £1.4bn merger with Britvic, maker of Tango

An out-of-date bottle of Irn Bru is being sold on eBay for £250.

The limited-edition drink expired in January 2018 and is believed to have commemorated Burns Night 2017.

The 750ml glass bottle features a portrait of Scots poet Rabbie Burn and a label which reads, “raise a glass to the bard”.

But, why is the expired beverage listed for such an exorbitant price?

According to the seller, from Glasgow, the bottle of Irn Bru was made using the original drink recipe, before the Sugar Tax was introduced.

(eBay/SWNS)

In 2018, AG Barr, the makers of Irn Bru, confirmed that production of the soft drink had ceased completely as the company had to adhere to the new UK government regulations targeting soft drinks, which officially went into effect in April last year.

Instead, the company produced a new recipe for the soft drink that featured sugar levels slashed from 10.3g per 100ml to just 4.7g.

Fans of the sugary beverage were disgruntled by the news, prompting more than 53,000 people to sign an online petition opposing the modification.

However, it was too late and Irn Bru as we know it changed forever.

While some chose to stock up on their favourite sugary soft drink before it was completely culled, others resorted to eBay, purchasing the original sugar content version for inflated prices.

But, forking out £250 on an out-of-date bottle isn’t the only way to enjoy the famous drink’s original recipe.

In October, AG Barr announced that it would be releasing a limited edition version of the iconic drink called “Irn Bru 1901”, which is based on the prototype recipe first created more than 100 years ago.

The authentic old recipe was discovered in a handwritten book stored in the company’s archives, and to add to the experience, the new drink is served in glass bottles.

“The 1901 recipe has aged beautifully over the last 118 years,” said Robin Barr, who unearthed the recipe.

“For a limited time, we’ll be producing a premium ‘old and unimproved’ Irn-Bru 1901 just as it was enjoyed by our first fans. This is Irn Bru as you’ve never tasted it.”

The 1901 version costs £2 and is available to buy now.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in