Elon Musk shows off the Model X at a launch event in September 2015
Elon Musk shows off the Model X at a launch event in September 2015

Tesla Model X owners complain of doors that won't open and other problems

Teething problems with the Model X are causing major headaches for some users

Doug Bolton@DougieBolton
Thursday 21 April 2016 14:05
comments

Some owners of Tesla's Model X have reported serious problems with their new cars - including doors which won't close, randomly-opening windows, and brakes which apply themselves.

ConsumerReports spoke to one owner who isn't completely happy with his Model X electric SUV, which costs $83,000 (£58,000) for the cheapest model and $115,500 (£80,000) for higher-end versions.

Earlier this month, retiree Michael Karpf flew to Tesla's factory in California to pick up his Model X, intending to take it on a cross-country road trip back to his home in New York.

As soon as he left, he started experiencing problems - the car's flashy gullwing doors either failed to close or didn't open, the driver's side window wouldn't roll down properly, and the enormous screen which sits in the the car's centre console would freeze and glitch out randomly.

Byron Deeter, an investor from California, said he experienced similar problems - both of the car's front windows repeatedly failed to close, some of the doors wouldn't open, and the automatic emergency brake would sometimes apply when reversing, bringing the car to a juddering halt every few metres, he claimed.

Writing on Twitter, Deeter said his Model X was "freaking out," and he was unable to drive it to work the next day.

A number of threads on Tesla's official forums have also mentioned issues relating to the car's software and hardware. Many owners have taken their cars to service centres for repairs, and although Tesla's customer service has been roundly praised, problems appear to be persisting.

Bugs and problems are always going to be a fact of life for early adopters, but there's a difference between having issues with a smartphone and a two-tonne car.

Earlier this month, Tesla announced it would be recalling around 2,700 Model X cars, over concerns that the rear seats could fold forward in a crash. The company will be hoping the same problems won't blight the launch of the Model 3, a lower-priced car which has been pre-ordered almost 400,000 times since its unveiling at the start of April.

In a statement to TechCrunch, Tesla said it was "committed to making the world's most reliable cars."

A spokeswoman said: "While we have seen some issues with early Model X builds, the issues are not widespread, and we are working closely with each owner to respond quickly and proactively to address any problems. We will continue to do so until each customer is fully satisfied.

"This commitment is one of the reasons why 98 per cent of our customers say they will but another Tesla as their next car."

The Independent has contacted Tesla for more information.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

View comments