<p>Emotional wellbeing has been drastically impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, charity says</p>

Emotional wellbeing has been drastically impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, charity says

Happiness in young people at its lowest in 13 years, Prince’s Trust warns

One in four say they will ‘never recover’ from emotional impact of the Covid-19 pandemic

Saman Javed
Wednesday 23 February 2022 15:04
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Happiness in young people is at its lowest point in 13 years, according to a new report by The Prince’s Trust.

A survey of 2,106 16 to 25-year-olds, commissioned by the charity, revealed that almost a quarter (23 per cent) of young people in the UK believe they will never recover from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Prince’s Trust, which was founded by Prince Charles in 1976, aims to help vulnerable young people get into jobs, education and training.

Its annual Youth Index in partnership with NatWest, released on Wednesday 23 February, reveals that 48 per cent of young people have experienced a mental health problem during the past year.

Of those surveyed, 36 per cent said the Covid-19 pandemic had a long-term impact on their stress levels, while 48 per cent said they feel burnt out and 46 per cent reported experiencing feelings of self-loathing.

Additionally, more than one in four (44 per cent) are more anxious now than they were at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Jonathan Townsend, the UK chief executive of The Prince’s Trust said the past two years could be “a scar for life on young people” unless urgent action was taken.

“This alarming downward spiral of anxiety, stress and lack of confidence for the future will impact young people today and in future generations, while widening the gap for the most disadvantaged,” he said.

“With the right support from businesses, government and charities we can turn this around and ensure young people have the right skills and confidence to feel positive about their future work, and about their life overall.”

The Covid-19 pandemic also had a greater impact on the emotional wellbeing of young women, the Prince’s Trust said.

While 19 per cent of men said they had been permanently affected by the events of the past two years, more than a quarter of women (26 per cent) reported the same.

Additionally, 50 per cent believe their mental health has declined, compared to 41 per cent of men.

One key area affecting young people’s emotional wellbeing was worries about money and employment.

For those not in work, education or training or those from poorer backgrounds, a quarter of young people (23 and 26 per cent) reported that they always feel anxious compared to 15 per cent of peers in work or education and 16 per cent per cent of young people overall.

Additionally, one in five young people don’t think their employment prospects will recover from the pandemic, while half of those who missed out on education or work due to Covid-19 restrictions believe they’ll be overlooked for jobs.

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