The Christmas and New Year period saw the most significant weight gains among Americans, Germans and Japanese people
The Christmas and New Year period saw the most significant weight gains among Americans, Germans and Japanese people

October is best month to begin dieting, new research suggests

'The less one gains, the less one then has to worry about trying to lose it'

Will Worley
Wednesday 05 October 2016 21:46
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October is the best month to start a diet, new research has suggested.

Due to negligible weight change during the summer months, most people are still at their lowest weight as autumn begins.

However, weight gained through over indulgence during the holiday season can take up to five months to lose, according to researchers from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab.

After October, bodyweight tends to increase as holiday festivities begin and continue into early January. The pattern is reflected in three wealthy countries, though at different times of the year, according to the researchers.

"Everyone gains weight over the holidays - Americans, Germans, Japanese," said the study's co-author Dr Brian Wansink.

The weight of Germans rose around Easter, and for Japanese people gains usually occurred during Golden Week, a series of holidays which take place in late April and early May.

However, the Christmas and New Year period saw the most significant weight gains, as Americans put on an average of 0.6kg, Germans added around 0.8kg and Japanese put on 0.5kg.

Dr Wansink continued: "Instead of making a New Year's Resolution, make an October resolution. It's easier to avoid holiday pounds altogether than to lose them after they happen.

“Make a plan in September or October so you don’t have to spend eight months trying to lose that weight. The less one gains, the less one then has to worry about trying to lose it."

The study followed the weigh patterns of nearly 3,000 people - 1,781 Americans, 760 German and 383 Japanese. The participants were given wireless digital scales to record their mass each day.

It also found that people who weighed themselves every day after holiday season were far quicker to lose the weight they had put on, reverting back to their normal levels in just one month.

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