Single mothers bought a house and are raising their children together in co-housing community

‘We all have this awareness of each other’s humanity, and a genuine desire to care for one another’

Meredith Clark
New York
Thursday 17 March 2022 20:16
Comments

Two single mom friends formed a sisterhood after deciding to raise their children together in a four-unit home.

Friends Holly Harper and Herrin Hopper have gone through multiple life changes in the past few years, including the end of both of their marriages. During the Covid-19 pandemic, the women found themselves living in individual apartments and struggling with the challenges of being a single parent. Harper is mom to her nine-year-old daughter and Hopper has two children, ages 13 and nine. After years of joking about raising their children on a commune, the women thought that purchasing a home together would help create a support system for themselves and their families. The two friends decided to purchase a home together in the Washington, DC area.

In August 2020, Harper and Hopper moved into a four-unit home in Takoma Park, Maryland where they rented out the remaining two units. Not long after, another single mom named Leandra Nichola contacted the women. She and her two children — ages nine and 12 — moved into the basement unit and a few months later, Harper and Hopper’s friend Jen Jacobs began renting the top floor unit.

The women call their home “Siren House,” named after the half-bird half-woman creature in mythology who lured sailors to their death with their enchanting songs. The women see the siren as a symbol of female empowerment. According to TODAY, the women hope to expand their co-housing concept to other moms.

Single moms bought a house and are raising their children together in co-housing community

“We’re definitely like sisters, and the kids are more like our nieces and nephews,” Harper said in an interview with the Washington Post. “We’re not dependent in an unhealthy way. We’re interdependent.”

“We all have this awareness of each other’s humanity, and a genuine desire to care for one another,” Hopper added. “We’re not romanticizing it. It’s real and true and deep and doable.”

Their support for each other even extends past Siren House. Together, the women helped Nichola fulfill a life-long dream of opening a cafe. In March 2021, the women co-founded the shop Main Street Pearl, a “youth-centered, queer friendly micro-café” managed by Nichola.

They say it takes a village to raise children. For these women, all it takes to form a village is a close-knit group of friends and a mutual desire for support.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in