What are the UK’s ‘lockdown confessions’?

A study found one in 10 parents admitted to avoiding certain subjects whilst home schooling their children  

Homeschooling UK
Homeschooling UK

Working in pyjamas, having a weekday lie in and fibbing about lack of Internet connection to avoid video calls are among Brits' top ‘lockdown confessions’.

A study of 2,000 adults found 78 per cent admitted to a minor naughty slip up this year.

In fact, the average person has committed seven misdemeanours each, with 13 per cent admitting their naughty behaviour has increased in the past 12 months.

This included cheating during a virtual quiz (16 per cent), giving their housemate a dodgy haircut (17 per cent) and using someone else’s Wi-Fi without permission (18 per cent).

When it comes to working from home, more than a fifth admitted to staying in their pyjamas all day and 19 per cent slept in when they were meant to be working.

A further 16 per cent fibbed about their Internet connection to avoid having to be on a virtual call, and almost one in 10 accidentally walked onto a call while dressed inappropriately.  

The research, commissioned by Tesco, found that despite such confessions, 43 per cent agreed that after this year no one should feel guilty for doing small naughty things.

Alessandra Bellini, chief customer officer at Tesco, said: “2020 has seen the nation adjust to new ways of living, working and shopping, which has led to some less than perfect, but perfectly understandable, behaviour.

"As we enter the festive season and begin to reflect on the year gone by, a quarter of us have confessed to feeling guilty for these minor slip-ups.”

The study also found a tenth of parents admitted to avoiding subjects they felt they were bad at during home schooling.

And more than a third of the nation purchased more items than they needed when shopping.

It was the year of baking trends, and 15 per cent confessed they ate too many slices of banana bread and more than one in 20 killed their sourdough starter.

More than a fifth admitted they have done a little mischievous thing in recent months because they saw someone else doing the same.

Those most most likely to encourage naughtiness were found to be partners (35 per cent) and friends (15 per cent).  

It also emerged that almost three quarters of adults polled via OnePoll believe as a nation we need to hear lighthearted stories this year with Christmas adverts being one of the top ways.  

Alessandra added: “At Tesco, however, we believe Christmas is all about spreading joy and this year, we’re encouraging everyone to forgive themselves for their naughty slip-ups.  

“After the year we’ve had, we all deserve to treat ourselves and so we say there is no naughty list (but parents, we’ll let you decide whether you tell your children that or not).”

SWNS

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