<p>The flat does not have a kitchen</p>

The flat does not have a kitchen

Is this the smallest flat you’ve ever seen? A 7-square-metre London flat is set to go on sale for £50,000

The bed sits on top of a cupboard, shelves and a microwave

Saman Javed
Friday 18 February 2022 12:35
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An east London flat measuring less than seven square metres is set to go on sale for a minimum price of £50,000.

While the property, located in a Victorian conversion in Lower Clapton, does have most of the necessities one might require such as a working shower and toilet, a sink, bed and microwave, there is no kitchen and hardly any space to walk.

The main room – an amalgamation of an eating area, living room and sleeping space – consists of an elevated bed above storage shelves, a cupboard and a microwave.

There is also a standalone sink with extra storage above it.

The bathroom is a tiny wet room, with the shower perched just inches away from the toilet.

The bed is on top of storage space and a microwave

The entire property measures 75 square feet, which is just under seven square metres.

Pictures of the microflat have been shared on social media, with many outraged by its small size and the bizarre placement of the microwave.

There is limited space to walk around

“Trying to imagine myself living in this 75sq ft Hackney flat and immediately felt claustrophobic. Perfect for a life of eating microwave dinners while staring at a white wall,” one person wrote.

The small wet room has a shower next to the toilet

Bidding for the flat is set to begin on 22 February, with the minimum opening bid set at £50,000.

The auction is less than half the price of the minimum average deposit for first-time buyers in London, which Halifax estimated to be around £130,000 in 2020.

According to the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics, the UK average house price rose by 10.8 per cent over the year to December 2021.

While house prices in London saw the lowest annual growth, it still remains the most expensive region in the UK, with average house prices reaching a record level of £521,000 in December 2021.

According to London-based surveyors Barnes and Barnes, the city is increasingly seeing the development of more microflats, which are being aimed at young professionals.

The surveyors said the microflat “could provide a solution to soaring rents in London” for those working in the city. Additionally, they could “also be a good solution to empty retail outlets and offices” affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

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