What is Quordle? The game four times harder than Wordle explained

Instead of one five-letter word, try four

Move over, Wordle, there’s a new game in town.

Quordle may have been inspired by the viral puzzle that continues to fill Twitter feeds with yellow and green squares, but it’s no one-trick pony.

Unlike its predecessor, which is played by millions of people daily, Quordle is a spin-off for those who want to challenge their linguistic skills at another level.

What is Quordle?

Quordle is Wordle quadrupled. The principles of the game remain the same – players guess five-letter words each day and the game indicates if you have the right letters in the right spaces using green, yellow and grey squares.

However, players have to guess four five-letter words at the same time in order to win at Quordle.

You get more goes at guessing the four words compared to Wordle, which gives players six guesses. Quordle gives you nine goes to solve all four words, with each guess appearing in all four fields.

Quordle also differs from its predecessor by giving players two gameplay options.The first is Daily Quordle, which, just like Wordle, only gives you once chance to compete each day.

But you also have the option to practice playing Quordle if you select the “Practice” button at the top of the game, which lets you play an unlimited number of practice games. However, the results of practice games do not count in a player’s streak.

How do you play Quordle?

You can access Quordle for free at Quordle.com.

Who made Quordle?

A group of Wordle fans developed Quordle, after they started playing yet another Worlde spin-off, Dordle.

Dordle is a version that lets plays guess two five-letter words at the same time.

On the Quordle website, creator Freddie Meyer said engineer David Mah put together the first prototype of the game “in a moment of evil and genius”.

Meyer said: “It was truly horrific code (it even had two keyboards) but I knew that I had to continue thie madness. With hindsight, he really baited me into finishing his monstrous creation.”

He also credits another person named Guilherme S Tows with Quordle’s creation.

Meyer says the game now has more than 500,000 players daily and has had more than a million total players.

Will Quordle remain free to play?

According to Meyer, he has “no plans to monetise Quordle”.

He said: “I just enjoy watching everyone enjoy this insane game.”

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