The touching symbolism behind the flowers at Prince Philip’s memorial service

Small details played a large part in today’s memorial service

<p>Westminster Abbey in London</p>

Westminster Abbey in London

Staff at Westminster Abbey have revealed the hidden meaning behind the flowers selected for Prince Philip’s memorial service, which took place today, Tuesday 29 March in London.

Flowers arranged around the gothic cathedral came in shades of red, white and blue, and included roses, carnations, eryngium (sea holly) and dendrobium orchids.

In a Twitter post, staff at Westminster Abbey explained the significance of these particular flowers, writing: “Orchids featured in the Queen’s wedding bouquet and sea holly echoes the Duke’s career in the Navy and affection for the sea.”

The flowers weren’t the only point of symbolism during the service.

The Queen, the Duchess of Cornwall, the Princess Royal and other members of the congregation were dressed in dark green, a subtle tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh, whose livery colour was Edinburgh Green

The Service of Thanksgiving was attended by most senior members of the royal family, including the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, the Duke of York, the Princess Royal, the Earl and Countess of Wessex, and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

The Queen arrived on the arm of Prince Andrew, just hours after Buckingham Palace confirmed Her Majesty would be in attendance.

It marks the first time that the Duke of York has made a public appearance since settling his sexual assault case in the US.

In February, Andrew paid more than £10m in damages to Virginia Giuffre, who accused him of sexual abuse - allegations he has vehemently denied - in an out-of-court settlement.

He also made a donation to a charity “in support of victims rights” to prevent the case proceeding to a civil trial.

Prince Andrew stepped down from royal duties in 2019 following allegations involving his friendship with the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

And in January, the Queen stripped her son of his honorary military titles and royal patronages, and he stopped using his HRH style.

After recovering from a bout of Covid and struggling with mobility issues, there was some doubt as to whether Her Majesty would be fit enough to attend today’s memorial.

The 95-year-old head of state pulled out of the Commonwealth Day service earlier this month due to mobility issues, and has previously spoken about her struggle to move.

Buckingham Palace said she has been actively involved in plans for the service, with many elements reflecting her wishes, however..

Prince Philip, the Queen’s husband of 73 years, died on 9 April 2021.

Philip’s funeral at St George’s Chapel in Windsor last year took place during Covid restrictions and was limited to just 30 people. The Queen sat alone during the farewell ceremony due to social distancing measures, and singing was banned at the time.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in