Snoozeshade founder accuses Aldi of copying 'unique' pram cover that protects babies from the sun

'I'm devastated that this has been done'

Sarah Young
Wednesday 24 April 2019 15:02
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The founder of a company that designs sun shades for prams has accused Aldi of copying her designs.

Cara Sayer, from Walton-on-Thames in Surrey, founded SnoozeShade in March 2010 after struggling to shield her own baby daughter, Holly, from the sun.

Sayer designed her range of sun shades - which are sold worldwide and available from retailers such as Boots and Argos - to exceed the required safety standards and made sure they were constructed using air-permeable fabrics that offer high-level sun protection.

Having launched the business from scratch, the mother-of-one was shocked to discover that supermarket giant Aldi have started to sell a similar product for half the price and took to social media to confront the retailer.

Sharing a side-by-side image of the two products on Twitter on Monday, Sayer wrote: “So @AldiUK has copied my product. Even down to using my words!

“I'm devastated as a loyal Aldi customer that this has been done. My product is a world first. It's unique.

“You cannot make the same quality as mine for £10!”

Sayer’s post has since garnered hundreds of likes and received messages of support from customers and fellow small business owners.

“Here’s an idea @AldiUK why not work with our great British business owners instead of ripping them off?” one person commented.

Another wrote: “Shocking that such a large company would just trample all over a mumpreneaur like this by copying all her hard work. Shame on you @AldiUK.”

Aldi has since responded to the claims, maintaining that its product is similar to others which can be found across major retailers like Amazon and Mothercare.

“Like many other similar products on the market our Mamia Stroller Sun Shade helps keep little ones safe and comfortable out of the sun,” an Aldi spokesperson tells The Independent.

This isn’t the first time a supermarket has been claimed to have copied products designed by a small business.

In 2018, childrenswear label Scamp & Dude accused Asda of plagiarising its trademark slogan.

Jo Tutchener-Sharp, who runs the brand, designed a collection with the words “a superhero has my back” emblazoned on a number of garments.

The mother-of-two posted a side-by-side image on Instagram showing her design alongside a blue long-sleeved T-shirt from Asda’s George label which featured the same slogan written on the back.

In response to the claims, Asda released the following statement: “We are sorry to hear about this concern and are working towards a resolution with those involved."

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